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I was making a circular icon with semi-transparency, so I started with a large filled-in circle with a black border, then I did white->alpha, and resized the image to my required size. Would it have made a difference if I resized first, and then did white->alpha?

Thanks.

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Yes.

In general, whenever you are re-sampling, this will have an impact if you are using any anti-aliasing, or the resampling algorithm is something other than nearest-neighbor.

Try the following exercise for a visual example:

In both cases, create your circular icon.

Case 1:

  1. Change white-center of the circle to alpha (0%, fully transparent).
  2. Re-sample (ie: down-sample to 25%) the entire image using something other than nearest neighbour (ie: actually use antialiasing of some sort)
  3. Paste a copy of the result over a red background.
  4. You should only see black and red colors inside the circle when you zoom in, with a smooth transition from black-to-red.

Case 2:

  1. Re-sample (ie: down-sample to 25%) the entire image using something other than nearest neighbour (ie: actually use antialiasing of some sort)
  2. Change white-center of the circle to alpha (0%, fully transparent).
  3. Paste a copy of the result over a red background.
  4. You should see a black outer circle, with a bit of a white halo inside of it, then the red center, with a smooth black-to-white transition, and a sharp white-to-red transition. This will depend on the aggressiveness factor you set with the magic-wand tool you are likely using to auto-select the region you want to modify the alpha properties of.

Now repeat case 2, but disable any sort of anti-aliasing, and enforce the use of a nearest neighbour algorithm rather than bi-cubic spline, Hermite, Gaussian, etc. Your results will look very similar to case 1, except you won't see the smooth transition from black-to-red when you zoom in, you will just see a sharp black-to-red transition.

In general, you will get the best subjective quality when working on your images first, then re-sampling later. If you paste it as its own layer, then you still have all the image data available any none is lost, the image is just rendered smaller.

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Thanks! This is a great explanation. –  BLuFeNiX May 28 '13 at 14:40
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