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I'm trying to mock up a data access library for Neo4J in .NET 4.5. I am using interfaces to define each command to the database.

Given:

    public interface IBaseRequest 
    {
        HttpMethod HttpMethod { get; }    
        string QueryUriSegment { get; }    
    }

    public interface ICreateNode  : IBaseRequest
    {
        void CreateNode();

    }

    public interface IBaseNodeActions  : ICreateNode,ICreateNodeWProperties //...And many others, all inherit from IBaseRequest
    {
    }

    internal class TestImplClass : IBaseNodeActions {


        public TestImplClass() {


        }
        void ICreateNode.CreateNode() {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
        //Only one copy of the HttpMethod and QueryUriSegment are able to be implemented
        DataCommands.HttpHelper.HttpMethod IBaseRequest.HttpMethod {
            get {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }

        string IBaseRequest.QueryUriSegment {
            get {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }

Problem is for each interface that inherits from IBaseRequest, I need a property implemented for each property that it's parent owns (HttpMethod, QueryUriSegment).

Is this possible? I know that using explicit implementation will be necessary but not sure how to push those into the implementing class.

Here is what I'd like to see in my implementing class:

public class TestImplClass : IBaseNodeActions{
public TestImplClass() {


        }
        void ICreateNode.CreateNode() {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        HttpMethod ICreateNode.HttpMethod {
            get {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }

        string ICreateNode.QueryUriSegment {
            get {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }
        HttpMethod ICreateNodeWProperties.HttpMethod {
            get {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }

        string ICreateNodeWProperties.QueryUriSegment {
            get {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }
}

Notice the ICreateNode and ICreateNodeWProperties instead of the IBaseRequest. I'm open to doing it differently but it seems like a modular, testable approach.

I hope that makes sense!

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I don't understand what you want. Is your test class implementing all interfaces??? If so, you want the properties to give different results depending on wich interface you call then? –  Daniel May 24 '13 at 19:32
    
Or are wanting to avoid implementing those properties so many times??? If so, implement the properties not explicitly. –  Daniel May 24 '13 at 19:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not possible to do what you intend with interfaces. As you've seen, when a class implements two or more interfaces which themselves inherit a common interface, the common interface is implicitly added, but only once - you don't get a variant of the base interface for each derived interface.

You could try the following (based on the Command pattern):

interface ICommand {
    HttpMethod HttpMethod { get; }    
    string QueryUriSegment { get; }

    void Execute();
}

class abstract BaseCommand : ICommand {
    public abstract HttMethod { get; }
    public abstract string QueryUriSegment { get; }
}

class CreateNodeCommand : ICommand {
    public override HttpMethod HttpMethod { get { /* return HttpMethod for "create node" */ } }
    public override string QueryUriSegment { get { /* return QueryUriString for "create node" */ } }

    public void Execute() { /* Create node... */ }
}

class CreateNodeWithPropertiesCommand : ICommand {
    public override HttpMethod HttpMethod { get { /* return HttpMethod for "create node with properties" */} }
    public override string QueryUriSegment { get { /* return QueryUriString for "create node with properties" */ } }

    public void Execute() { /* Create node with properties ... */ }
}

In your TestImplClass you can have each command as a separate property:

public TestImplClass {
    public ICommand CreateNode { get; private set; }
    public ICommand CreateNodeWithProperties { get; private set; }

    public TestImplClass(ICommand createNode, ICommand createNodeWithProperties) {
        this.CreateNode = createNode;
        this.CreateNodeWithProperties = createNodeWithProperties;
    }
}

Each command then has it's own HttpMethod and QueryUriSegment properties and you can mock each command and pass them into the constructor of TestImplClass when testing.

When it comes to using any of the commands you can just call Execute() on the appropriate property e.g: dataAccess.CreateNode.Execute();.

share|improve this answer
    
I can see how this approach would work in my situation. If you notice my code, it is dealing with "Node" commands. However the reason I am trying to design it this way is to accommodate at least 3 other hierarchies of other commands using the same pattern. Where would you suggest I branch this design off to build those new implementations? –  Robnauticus May 26 '13 at 13:57
    
Can you elaborate on what you mean by hierarchies of commands? –  Talon May 28 '13 at 12:21
    
There are other non-Node related interfaces that inherit the same parent IBaseRequest from my example. There would then be another interface that would combine them into IBaseRelationshipActions as an example. –  Robnauticus May 28 '13 at 15:54
    
You can follow what you originally intended and have the commands grouped in interfaces. You may find that with too many commands the constructor becomes unmaintainable or at the very least unwieldy to use. An alternative would be to create a single data access class with the operations implemented as methods e.g.: CreateNode(Node node) CreateNode(Node node, object parameters). Done properly this needn't impact testability. –  Talon May 28 '13 at 21:14
    
Hi Talon, I am re-working my UML diagrams with your proposal using the command pattern. Question: In your code above did you intend CreateNodeCommand : BaseCommand instead of CreateNodeCommand : ICommand? It seems like that's what you intended. Thanks btw! –  Robnauticus May 29 '13 at 19:15

You could define an abstract BaseRequest Class. That one implementing the IBaseRequest properties.

So, the classes implementing all child interfaces would inherit this BaseRequest and have the properties automatically implemented.

share|improve this answer

Forgive if I misunderstood exactly what you were looking for.

You could have a base class:

public abstract class BaseNodeActions : IBaseNodeActions
{
    public abstract void CreateNode();
    public abstract HttpMethod HttpMethod {get;set;}
    ....
}

Then just make your TestImplClass inherit BaseNodeActions

If you want, you could also ignore using abstract and do the following:

public class BaseNodeActions : IBaseNodeActions
{
    public virtual void CreateNode() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    public virtual HttpMethod HttpMethod {get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    ....
}

If you make the properties virtual, you will only need to override the ones you actually need. You may want to remove the throwing of exceptions and make it return default values if your design allows for it.

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