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I have a simple class like the one below, but I have a question about using generics to return a value.

import java.util.ArrayList;
public class Box<T extends Number> {
    private ArrayList<T> list;
    public Box(){
        list = new ArrayList<T>();
    }
    public T get(int i){
        if(i <list.size())
            return list.get(i);
        else
            return 0; // Problem
    }
}

I must get 0 (or 0.0 - it depends on the value of T) when i < list.size() is not null. How can I code this properly to do that?

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2  
Return null instead, 0 is not an object. –  Sotirios Delimanolis May 24 '13 at 19:57
2  
The problem is that although you wrote "return 0", java needs to return an instance of class T, which is not known at compile time. –  Giovanni Botta May 24 '13 at 20:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you really want to return 0 by default, you could do something like this:

public abstract class Box<T extends Number> {
    private List<T> list;

     public Box(){
        list = new ArrayList<T>();
    }

    public T get(int i){
        if(i <list.size())
            return list.get(i);
        else
            return getDefault();
    }

    protected abstract T getDefault();
}

Then have an implementation for each Number subtype you want to support, eg

public class IntegerBox extends Box<Integer> {

    @Override
    protected Integer getDefault() {
        return 0;
    }
}

and

public class DoubleBox extends Box<Double> {

    @Override
    protected Double getDefault() {
        return 0D;
    }
}

etc.

A nice feature of this is that it can return any default, not just zero...and the same principle would work for any type of Object, not just Numbers.

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1  
While this can be a good solution, you must implement a child for every class that extends Number: Byte, Short, Integer, Long, Float, Double, BigInteger, BigDecimal, AtomicInteger (and on...). There is more code doing this than just handling a null result or handling an Exception. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 24 '13 at 20:08
2  
Yeah there's more code...but it's giving the original asker what he asked for! –  Tom McIntyre May 24 '13 at 20:09
    
IMO the effort for doing the good design is not worth it for this specific case. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 24 '13 at 20:10
    
I think this is overkill compared to just parameterizing it. Parameterizing still allows one generic class, and puts roughly the same burden on the caller. –  Mark Peters May 24 '13 at 22:50
    
I guess it depends on whether you're writing a library or an application. –  Tom McIntyre May 25 '13 at 14:12

If you really need your Box to return a zero or default value that when your get does not find a match, you can have a constructor parameter for the zero or default of type T.

Then return that default value in your get method.

Example:

public class Box<T extends Number> {
    private ArrayList<T> list;
    private T defaultValue;
    public Box( T defaultValue){
        list = new ArrayList<T>();
        this.defaultValue = defaultValue;
    }
    public T get(int i){
        if(i <list.size())
            return list.get(i);
        else
            return defaultValue;
    }
}
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0 is an int and generics works only with object references (not primitive types). A way to fix your code would be returning null instead.

public T get(int i){
    if(i <list.size()) {
        return list.get(i);
    }
    return null; // Problem solved
}

I must get 0 (or 0.0 - it depends on T) when i < list.size() not null

Take into account that the presentation themes as show 0 to user must be handled by the classes/methods that shows the data, not by these methods. This means, there's no way to return 0 when you must return an object reference.

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You can't do that without creating subclasses for all the types and without parameterizing and explicitly checking the type. And this is normal: I could create a type

public StrictlyPositiveInteger implements Number

that doesn't even have the value 0, and then do

Box<StrictlyPositiveInteger> box = new Box<>();

In other words: you want specific behaviour for specific types, so you can't do it in a generic way.

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Solid explanation and example. –  jahroy May 25 '13 at 0:30

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