Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a a few classes and would like to change a boolean value within a specific instance of a specific class based on a switch, but cant seem to get a 'pointer' to the value, I just get a copy.

Class aClass;
Class bClass;
Class cClass;

public class Class
{
    public bool b = true;
    ...
}

void Method(int i)
{
    bool localBool;

    switch(i)
        case 1:
            localBool = aClass.b;
            break;
        case 2:
            localBool = bClass.b;
            break;
        case 3:
            localBool = cClass.b;
            break;

    localBool = false; // This changes the localBool, but not Class.b
}

EDIT: What if I had 3 booleans in the class instead of 3 classes?

Class aClass;

public class Class
{
    public bool a = true;
    public bool b = true;
    public bool c = true;
    ...
}

void Method(int i)
{
    bool localBool;

    switch(i)
        case 1:
            localBool = aClass.a;
            break;
        case 2:
            localBool = aClass.b;
            break;
        case 3:
            localBool = aClass.c;
            break;

    localBool = false; // This changes the localBool, but not aClass.Bool
}
share|improve this question
3  
Start by reading about Value Types and Reference Types. –  Oded May 24 '13 at 20:33
    
Side notes: it is generally better to expose properties than fields. It will not change problem you are facing much (same solutions as suggested in answers). –  Alexei Levenkov May 24 '13 at 21:27

5 Answers 5

I would do it like this.

void Method(int i)
{
    Class local;

    switch(i)
        case 1:
            local = aClass;
            break;
        case 2:
            local = bClass;
            break;
        case 3:
            local = cClass;
            break;

    local.b = false;
}

By the way, pointers in C# are supported, but strongly discouraged. They should only be used when there isn't another way.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that there are other methods of indirection besides pointers, and there are appropriate means of using them here. For example, you could use an Action<bool> that encapsulates the property setter and use that within the switch, or hold onto a reference to the Class type rather than just passing in the bool. This is, in general, how C# handles problems that other languages would generally solve using pointers. –  Servy May 24 '13 at 20:42
    
+1. Note that all languages have the same issue when getters/setters involved (which is simply way more common in C# as it is recommended way to expose fields), but even in C++ you'd have to invent some sort of shared base class/"set a value of given property on given instance" if there is no field directly exposed. –  Alexei Levenkov May 24 '13 at 21:23

There are no pointers outside of the unsafe context in C#. Classes are reference types so when you do something like MyClass mc = new MyClass(); you are getting the nearest there is to a pointer in C#. As far as I'm concerned the two are conceptually the same, just in C# much of the potential for errors is removed by the runtime/compiler. Continuing with my example if I were to do something like;

  MyClass mc2 = mc;

Then mc2 would also reference the same memory as mc. Going further with that. If I then went mc2.MyBool = false; then had if (mc.MyBool) it would not meet the condition because I have just changed the bool on the same object. This behavior is exactly what you would expect if you're used to dealing with pointers and objects in c++.

share|improve this answer

Because the accessor wrapper approach was touched on in a comment, here's roughly how that would look.

EDIT

void Method(int i)
{
    Action<bool> localBool = null;

    switch(i)
        case 1:
            localBool = v => aClass.b = v;
            break;
        case 2:
            localBool = v => bClass.b = v;
            break;
        case 3:
            localBool = v => cClass.b = v;
            break;

    localBool(false); // This changes the localBool, and Class.b
}
share|improve this answer
    
@AlexeiLevenkov yeah, it was a bit over the top, simplified the answer. –  mlorbetske May 24 '13 at 21:46
    
+1: even fits on a screen now :). –  Alexei Levenkov May 24 '13 at 21:57

After your edit, your problem is that Booleans are value typed. Therefore, when you copy the value type to another instance, you aren't getting the reference, just the value. If you want to change the value in your Class, you would have to do it directly. If you have the reference to the class, it should be easy.

 LocalClass.a = false;
share|improve this answer

.net contains two kind of types: reference and value types. Classes, string, etc are reference types. Int, DateTime, boolean, etc are value types. There are a lot of difference between these types. In your case the most important - assigning value of value type to variable will copy the value. That's why your localBool it's just another independent variable with some value. All modifications will not change values in classes.

In your case I would prefer to return reference to class as a result of Method with switch block and modify boolean property after that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.