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I have a class CTag, which check validity of attributes of HTML tags.

class CTag {
  vector<string> m_attr; // list of attributes
  string m_tag;
 public:
  void CheckAttr (); // go through the vector and search for valid attributes
};

class CDiv : public CTag {

 public:
  CDiv( const string & tag ) {
    string attr[] = {"id","class"};
    /* I would like to save string and array to the main class :

    int size = sizeof(attr) / sizeof(string);
    m_attr.assign(attr,attr+size);
    m_tag = tag;

    but I can't because they are private
    */
  }
};

and another tag classes...

in main:

CDiv a("<div class=\"haha\">);
CDiv b("<div hello=\"haha\">"); // wrong attribute

I don't have problem with parsing the string and search for valid attributes. I'm just not sure how to save those datas. Should I make a setter method? Or could I make those variables public?

Thanks for your help.

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make them protected instead of leaving them as private. –  Named May 24 '13 at 20:54
    
Is div really a tag? Cause if this isn't an "is-a" relationship logically, I wouldn't use inheritance. –  Luchian Grigore May 24 '13 at 20:55
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use keyword protected:

class CTag {
 protected:
 ^^^^^^^^^^

  vector<string> m_attr; // list of attributes
  string m_tag;

 public:
  ...
};

default access is private and the items with private section are private for children. If you use protectd the children can access to them.

Better practice is using setter/getter:

class CTag {
  vector<string> m_attr; // list of attributes
  string m_tag;

 protected:
  void setTag(const string &tag)
  {
    m_tag = tag;
  }

 public:
  ...
};

Now, the child can set tag by setTag.

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You could make them protected, which would make those data members visible to the derived classes. Or you could keep the members private and offer a protected setter (possibly also a protected getter).

    class CTag {
    public:
        void CheckAttr ();
    protected:
//  ^^^^^^^^^^
        void set_tag(std::string s)
        {
             m_tag = std::move(s);
        }
        void set_attributes(std::vector<string> attrs)
        {
             m_attr = std::move(attrs);
        }
    private:
        vector<string> m_attr; // list of attributes
        string m_tag;
    };

Protected members are not accessible "from the outside" of your CTag class, just like private members, but unlike private members, they are accessible from the derived class.

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My approach would look like this:

class CTag
{
public:
  CTag(string const &tag_)
   : m_tag(tag_) {}
  void CheckAttr();
protected:
  virtual vector<string> const &Attributes() const = 0;
private:
  string m_tag;
};

class CDiv : public CTag
{
public:
  CDiv(string const &tag_) : CTag(tag_)
  { if (m_vec_attr.empty()) m_vec_attr.assign(m_attrs.begin(), m_attrs.end()); }
protected:
  virtual vector<string> const &Attributes() const { return m_vec_attr; }
private:
  static vector<string> m_vec_attr;
  static std::tr1::array<string, 2> m_attrs;
     // the '2' needs to match the number of attrs, kind of a pain
};
std::tr1::array<string,2> CDiv::m_attrs = {"id","class"};
vector<string> CDiv::m_vec_attr;

The problem of initializing a simple type is shown by passing it down in the constructor; that's the preferred approach to initializing members.

The array/vector fu is due to the difficulty of initializing a vector if you're not working with C++11. If you are, then ditch the array and don't bother with the constructor initialization or the conversion, just initialize the static vector. In fact, if you are, you may be able to pass a literal { "id", "class" } argument from the CDiv constructor to the CTag constructor; I don't have a compiler at my fingertips to test that.

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