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I have a question regarding performance of the MySQL DBMS. Perhaps a trivial matter. There are two tables and I need to get result as below :

     PLAYERS                           VISITS
     ID | PLAYER_NAME                  ID | PLAYER_ID | SEEN
     ----------------                  ---------------------------
     1  | user 1                        1 | 2         | 2012-12-12
     2  | user 2                        2 | 2         | 2012-12-13
     3  | user 3                        3 | 3         | 2012-12-13
     4  | user 4                        4 | 3         | 2012-12-14
                                        5 | 3         | 2012-12-14
                                        6 | 2         | 2012-12-15
RESULT:
ID | PLAYER_NAME | LAST_SEEN  
----------------------------
 1 | user 1      | NULL / 'NEVER'
 2 | user 2      | 2012-12-15
 3 | user 3      | 2012-12-14
 4 | user 4      | NULL / 'NEVER'

My current query is :

   SELECT 
   players.id, 
   players.player_name, 
   MAX(visits.seen) AS last_seen
   FROM players
   LEFT JOIN visits ON players.id = visits.player_id
   GROUP BY players.id,players.player_name 

Works for me but it seems to me that it should be a more efficient method.

It's just key part of a larger query.

Thomas

share|improve this question
    
Why group by player_name? Why LEFT JOIN and not INNER JOIN? –  user4035 May 24 '13 at 21:53
    
he has an aggregate function 4035 –  Drew Pierce May 24 '13 at 21:54
    
@DrewPierce got it –  user4035 May 24 '13 at 21:55
    
do you want the nulls or not –  Drew Pierce May 24 '13 at 21:57
    
Why would you think that the query with the left join and aggregation is inefficient? –  Gordon Linoff May 24 '13 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To make this join efficient there has to be an index on player_id in VISITS. Look into

`CREATE INDEX` 

here.

To check the query efficiency you can always use:

EXPLAIN SELECT /* your select here */

Also if PLAYERS.ID is unique and primary key it's perfectly fine to group only by this id.

SELECT 
   players.id, 
   players.player_name, 
   MAX(visits.seen) AS last_seen
FROM players
   LEFT JOIN visits ON players.id = visits.player_id
GROUP BY players.id

but your original query is perfectly fine. Make sure you fully understand GROUP BY and the consequences for columns not included in GROUP BY if you omit columns. This can have unintended consequences in other queries (where the same id doesn't mean the same name i.e.)

share|improve this answer
    
It's perfectly fine only with settings that allow it. It's not the best practice (even if it slightly more efficient.) –  ypercube May 24 '13 at 22:06
    
Could you explain? I don't quite get it. –  lorey May 24 '13 at 22:10
1  
The query will be rejected with error if the ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY mode has been enabled. –  ypercube May 24 '13 at 22:13
1  
And about the best practice comment, I mean that it's not something that novices in SQL should use, as it can lead to indeterminate results (in other situations, not here. You correctly state that it will work fine if the players(id) is either unique or the primary key.) –  ypercube May 24 '13 at 22:15
    
Thanks for you explanation :) Now I get it. Yes, you are right, of course :) –  lorey May 24 '13 at 22:17

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