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I have the following situation where I need to move construct t2 from t1. Unfortunately it is not possible to do that (constness violation I suppose)
What is the right approach to handle that transparently from the caller of foo ? (ie. without requiring a passing by value and an explicit std::move)

struct T
{
    T() = default;
    ~T() = default;
    T(T&&) = default;
};

T foo(const T& t) 
{
    T t3;

    if (predicate)
        return t3;
    else
        return std::move(t);
}

int main()
{
  T t1;
  T t2 = foo(t1);

  return 0; 
}
share|improve this question
2  
If you need to move-construct t2 from t1, why don't you do T t2{std::move(t1)}? – Andy Prowl May 25 '13 at 0:28
2  
What is the purpose of foo? – GManNickG May 25 '13 at 0:29
    
See the update for a more concrete example – 3XX0 May 25 '13 at 0:36
2  
@3XX0: So why are you taking a reference to const if you want to move from it? Take a T&& and let the caller do foo(std::move(t1)) – Andy Prowl May 25 '13 at 0:38
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could do this if you wanted to badly enough. To do it, your foo would end up as essentially a re-implementation of std::move.

struct T
{
    T() = default;
    ~T() = default;
    T(T&&) = default;
};

template<class T> struct my_remove_reference      {typedef T type;};
template<class T> struct my_remove_reference<T&>  {typedef T type;};

// The third part of a normal `remove_reference`, but which we don't need in
// this case (though it'll all still be fine if you un-comment this).
//template<class T> struct my_remove_reference<T&&> {typedef T type;};

template <typename T>
typename my_remove_reference<T>::type &&foo(T &&t) {
    return static_cast<typename my_remove_reference<T>::type &&>(t);
}

int main()
{
  T t1;
  T t2 = foo(t1);

  return 0; 
}

Now, despite the fact that you can/could do this, the other answers remain more or less correct -- even though you can do it, you almost certainly shouldn't. If you used this foo on a real class that supports move construction (i.e., will really move the state from the source to the destination) you'd end up basically destroying your source object even though it remains visible.

Doing this with your edited question, where foo could, but wouldn't always, destroy the source object would be particularly pernicious. With the right name that makes it clear that foo really moves from the source, it could, possibly, be just barely reasonable to do this -- but (at least to me) a function that might or might not destroy its argument seems drastically worse than one that does so dependably. Obviously, a version of foo like above that just does the same thing as std::move is pointless, but a version that also did some other processing on the input (and, for whatever reason, couldn't be used along with std::move) might, possibly, be just barely acceptable if you really didn't have any other choice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that perfect answer :) Indeed, that seems silly after suppressing all the code around ... – 3XX0 May 25 '13 at 1:01

What is the right approach to handle that transparently from the caller of foo ?

You cannot do that, and that's intended to be so. An lvalue is never moved from transparently.

Since a moved-from object is usually left in an unknown (yet legal) state, it would be dangerous if a client could pass an lvalue as the argument to a function, and that function were allowed to silently move from it. The client may be left with a zombie object without even knowing it!

Therefore, the language enforces the rule that moving from an lvalue must be a conscious action, and shall occur by explicitly turning the lvalue into an rvalue (actually, an xvalue) through a call to std::move().

In this case, I would say your function foo() - whatever it is actually supposed to do - should take an rvalue reference, and the client should invoke it like so:

T t2 = foo(std::move(t1)); 

Notice, that this last suggestion may not be correct once you turn a meaningless name such as foo() into something that reflects the semantics of some particular operation in some concrete program. Without knowing what is the meaning of that operation, however, I can only provide formal, mechanical advice on how to make your code snippet compile, and how to think about move semantics in general.

share|improve this answer

without requiring a passing by value and an explicit std::move

C++ doesn't let you move things without at least one of those. This is by design.

The cardinal rule of movement in C++ is that it isn't allowed to happen by accident. If you have an lvalue, and you want to pass it to some function that may move from it, then you as the caller must use std::move. This is by design, so that it is clear that the caller's intent is that the object will be moved from.

That way, when you're scanning through code, you can see if you accidentally used a moved-from value in an improper way, without having to see anything more than the explicit use of std::move.

What you want is not something you should want.

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