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This is how I write my singleton classes.

public class MyClass
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Singleton
    /// </summary>
    private static MyClass instance;

    /// <summary>
    /// Singleton access.
    /// </summary>
    public static MyClass Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                _instance = new MyClass();
            }
            return _instance;
        }
    }

    private MyClass() { .... }
}

How To Create A Singleton Pattern That Is Reusable?

Singleton patterns present the following challenges.

  • The constructor is private or protected.
  • A base class can't instantiate an inherited class. So you can reuse a common abstract MyAbstractSingletonClass.
  • It has to have a local read-only property to get the instance.

The Problem

I'm using this pattern on a number of classes and always have to write the same code. How can I write something that is reused whenever I need a singleton?

share|improve this question
    
I'm trying to understand what you're trying to accomplish here. Do you want the base class to have knowledge of the derived class, and return that, or are you wanting the base class to just "know" somehow to return the only class derived from it? Can you add a static function to the base class called Initialize(string type) or something to tell the base class what to initialize the single instance with? A little more clarification on what you're trying to do and what your constraints are would help. –  Gjeltema May 25 '13 at 1:49
    
@Gjeltema I edit my question. Hope that helps. –  Mathew Foscarini May 25 '13 at 2:04
2  
Yep, it did, but BTownTKD beat me to typing up the answer. :) –  Gjeltema May 25 '13 at 2:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can achieve this using a combination of a self-referencing generic type constraint, and a "new()" type constraint.

The "new" constraint ensures that any child class will always have a parameterless constructor, so _instance = new T(); will always work.

The self-referencing type constraint ensures that the "Instance" static property always returns the correct Type; not the "base" type. Your singleton base class would look something like this:

public abstract class SingletonBase<T> 
    where T : SingletonBase<T>, new()
{
    private static T _instance = new T();
    public static T Instance
    {
        get
        {                
            return _instance;
        }   
    }
}

Your child classes will look like this:

public class MyChildSingleton : SingletonBase<MyChildSingleton>
{
    //Done!
}

Of course, if you want your singleton to be general-purpose, you should also change your "create singleton instance" code slightly, to use the "double-check lock" pattern, or the Lazy class, to make it thread-safe.

The big caveat: if you use this method, the "new()" constraint pretty much ensures that your class will always have a public, parameterless constructor. That means your end-users could always just call new MyChildSingleton() if they really wanted, bypassing your singleton instance entirely. Your singleton would be "by convention," instead of strictly enforced. To get around this would take a bit more engineering. In the above scenario, the convention seems to be that you should name your static instance "Default" instead of "Instance." This subtly conveys the fact that your class offers a 'suggested' singleton instance, but using it is technically optional.

I've made some attempts to strictly enforce the singleton pattern, and the end result was to use reflection to manually invoke a private constructor. You can see my full code attempt here.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, you did it! Thanks. :) –  Mathew Foscarini May 25 '13 at 2:07
1  
Thanks for the lock tip. This is a multithreaded app so it does apply. You're smart for 28 :) –  Mathew Foscarini May 25 '13 at 2:10
2  
@MathewFoscarini - please check out Jon Skeet's article on Singletons before using this code as is: csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx as it may require some multithreading touches and could benefit from Lazy class. –  Alexei Levenkov May 25 '13 at 2:14

You are correct - as it currently stands you cannot achieve this. But you can approach it using generics, note that with this approach you will get one singleton instance for each unique derived type:

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var x = new MyDerivedClass();
            Console.WriteLine(x.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine(x.Instance.ToString());

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }


    public abstract class MyBaseClass<T> where T : class, new()
    {
        protected T GetInstance()
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                lock (_lockObj)
                {
                    if (_instance == null)
                        _instance = new T();
                }
            }
            return _instance;
        }

        public T Instance
        {
            get { return GetInstance(); }
        }

        private volatile static T _instance;
        private object _lockObj = new object();
    }

    public class MyDerivedClass : MyBaseClass<MyDerivedClass>
    {
        public MyDerivedClass() { }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

I recently suggested this answer to a related question:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/20599467

With this method, the base class manages creation of all instances of derived classes, as all derived class constructors require an object that only the base class can provide, and there is no need for the parameterless constructor restriction.

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The simple answer is that you can't implement the singleton pattern in a base class.

However, you can implement other creational design patterns that may be suitable for what you're trying to accomplish. For example, take a look at Abstract Factory.

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