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I am trying to replace a ">" in a string in jQuery but the problem I'm having is that I need to preserve the HTML. Here's an example of what I'm talking about:

<div class="link">
    <a href="#">
        <span>Test ></span>
    </a>
    <a href="#">
        <span>Test 2 ></span>
    </a>
    <a href="#">
        <span>Test 3 ></span>
    </a>
</div>

If I use this code:

$(".link").each(function() {
    var text = $(this).text();
    text = text.replace(/>/g,'/');
    $(this).text(text);
});

It strips the <span> tags out of the HTML since it's replacing it with text.

If I use this code:

$(".link").each(function() {
    var html = $(this).html();
    html = html.replace(/>/g,'/');
    $(this).html(html);
});

It replaces the closing tags of the span and anchor tags since they are technically > as well. I'm trying to find a way to just replace the >'s that are text as opposed to all instance of it.

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1  
@BenjaminGruenbaum's suggestion also fixes your issue, if you ensure the >'s are escaped, all you'd have to do is replace the escaped version &gt;, so then you could just use the $(this).html(); version of you example code snippets. –  Mathijs Flietstra May 25 '13 at 1:49
    
you should use &gt; instead of >. > is for html tags. Your html is invalid as Benjamin says –  user1321471 May 25 '13 at 1:50
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum are you sure about that? –  Musa May 25 '13 at 1:52
1  
@BenjaminGruenbaum what spec that's a guide. –  Musa May 25 '13 at 1:58
1  
@Musa Wow man, you're right. The spec only forbids < in section 4.5, probably because a > isn't supposed to be ambiguous. I just read that section 5 times, both in HTML5 and HTML4.01, Thanks for teaching me something :) This HTML OP is using is valid! It passes W3C validation and I manually went through elements in the document and parsed them using the spec. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 25 '13 at 2:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this way:-

Demo

$(".link a span").each(function () {
    var text = $(this).text(function (_, oldVal) {
        return oldVal.replace(/>/g, '/')
    });
});

This will work for html with > as well as &gt;

<div class="link"> <a href="#">
        <span>Test &gt;</span>
    </a>
 <a href="#">
        <span>Test 2 &gt;</span>
    </a>
 <a href="#">
        <span>Test 3 &gt;</span>
    </a>

</div>
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I get Uncaught TypeError: Object 0 has no method 'replace' , Chrome 27, Windows 8 –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 25 '13 at 1:52
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum Updated fiddle. MIssed the fiddle update. –  PSL May 25 '13 at 1:53

You could just search the actual text that have the > instead of the whole html.

$(".link span").contents().each(function() {
    var text = this.nodeValue;
    text = text.replace(/>/g,'/');
    this.nodeValue = text;
});

http://jsfiddle.net/L5m24/

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This simple function will, recursively, remove all > or &gt; from any text element it finds down the road:

function removeAllGt(element) {
    $(element).contents().each(function () {
        if (this.nodeType == 3) {
            this.nodeValue = this.nodeValue.replace(/>/g, '/');
        } else {
            removeAllGt(this);
        }
    });
}

Usage:

$(".link").each(function () {
    removeAllGt(this);
});

Demo fiddle here.

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Just assign this HTML to innerHTML of a temporary element, and then read innerHTML of this temporary element, and you'll get valid HTML code with invalid angle bracket converted to HTML entity. You can then replace the &gt; entity instead of > character.

Live demo

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