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I'm trying to implement a function to add two overly large (let's say 1000 digit long) numbers stored in strings. I'm having problems with correct conversions so I can add numbers correctly.

So far, this is what I've done:

string addBegin (string low, string high, int diff)
{
    for (int i = 0; i <= diff; i++)
        low = "0" + low;
    high = "0" + high;

    cout << "low: " << low << "\nhigh: " << high << endl;

    string result;
    int sum, carry = 0;

    for (int i = low.length()-1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        sum = (int)low[i] + (int)high[i] + carry;
        carry = 0;
        if (sum > 9)
        {
            sum -= 10;
            carry = 1;
        }
        result = to_string(sum) + result;
    }

    return result;
}

string add (string a, string b)
{
    int diff = a.length() - b.length();

    if (diff <= 0) return addBegin(a, b, abs(diff));
    else return addBegin(b, a, diff);
}

int main (void)
{
    string x = add("52","205");
    cout << "result: " << x << endl;

    return 0;
}

Output:

low: 0052
high: 0205 //the first zero is for potential carry
result: 87899293 //wrong, should be 0257

The result here is made of 4 numbers: 87, 89, 92 and 93. That is obviously wrong, I did some unwanted additions with ASCII values. Any ideas how to make this work? Or is there, by any chance, some ridiculously simple way to add two veeeeery long numbers?

share|improve this question
    
pls help me understand, is result = low + high, if they are integers, not strings? and is the only caveat is the numbers are "veeeeery long"? –  Bill May 25 '13 at 2:02
    
When approaching such problems, try to think in small numbers. For example, what should the algorithm do in order to add 5+4? and then, 75+46? –  Ilya Kogan May 25 '13 at 2:05
    
i am unable to understand, so just asking -- if all you want to do is add two large numbers, why cann't you use them as big integers (stackoverflow.com/questions/117429/…) instead of string, and do addition? –  Bill May 25 '13 at 2:07
2  
@Bill A bigint is just a string in another numeric base :) This is a common exercise. –  Potatoswatter May 25 '13 at 2:08
    
@IlyaKogan Sure, but I don't think that's the main issue here. If I were to add up 75+46, I'd like to get sum of 5+6 and not the sum of their ASCII values. –  Saraph May 25 '13 at 2:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
    sum = (int)low[i] + (int)high[i] + carry;

This adds the values of the character encodings in e.g. ASCII. You want to subtract '0' from the encoding to get the numeric value.

    sum = low[i] - '0' + high[i] - '0' + carry;
share|improve this answer
    
Aaaaand. Working solution is born. I remember doing something similar, but not entirely correct it seems. Thanks. –  Saraph May 25 '13 at 2:13
    
I suspect an extra leading '0' is in the result, you may need to conditionally remove it. –  chux May 25 '13 at 2:16
    
@chux Yes, I'm well aware of that. Thanks. ;) –  Saraph May 25 '13 at 2:19

Do not forget subtracting '0' from low[i] and high[i] when doing the math.

(int)low[i] is 0x30..0x39 for chars '0'..'9'.

share|improve this answer

A problem is that you use

sum = (int)low[i] + (int)high[i] + carry;

which should be

sum = low[i] - '0' + high[i] - '0' + carry;
share|improve this answer

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