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I know nothing about Sed but need this command (which works fine on Ubuntu) to work on a Mac OSX:

sed -i \"/ $domain .*#drupalpro/d\" /etc/hosts

I'm getting:

sed: 1: "/etc/hosts": extra characters at the end of h command
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How have you tried researching this? Did you try shortening the regex in question to isolate a problem character? Did you google your error message with your sed version? Please post an SSCCE, which in this case means show that you are failing on a small regex so you know the problem part. –  djechlin May 25 '13 at 3:08
7  
try -i.bak for OSX. let me know if that works. –  Bill May 25 '13 at 3:10
1  
I did research it, actually, but don't understand enough about sed and regex to even understand the answers. I'm still learning all this stuff. –  Michelle Williamson May 26 '13 at 18:12
    
Just ran into the same problem, seems in OSX -i doesn't work properly without an extension :( –  Olly The Ninja Jan 18 at 0:59

2 Answers 2

Ubuntu ships with GNU sed, where the suffix for the -i option is optional. OS X ships with BSD sed, where the suffix is mandatory. Try sed -i ''

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This worked. Thank you!!! –  Michelle Williamson May 26 '13 at 18:11
    
So just follow the sed -i with single quotes, sed -i '1i export PATH="$HOME/.composer/vendor/bin:$PATH"' $HOME/.bashrc Still does not work for me –  pal4life May 7 '14 at 14:39
    
@pal4life the point is that you need a separate set of quotes before you start the command, so something like sed -i '' '1i export PATH="$HOME/.composer/vendor/bin:$PATH"' $HOME/.bashrc –  microtherion May 7 '14 at 15:24
    
@microtherion thank you very much for your explanation and example. I am not familiar with the sed command either and your answer / comment helped me solve the issue, this should be the selected answer! –  superuseroi May 13 '14 at 11:13

man is your friend.

OS X

 -i extension
         Edit files in-place, saving backups with the specified extension.
         If a zero-length extension is given, no backup will be saved.  It
         is not recommended to give a zero-length extension when in-place
         editing files, as you risk corruption or partial content in situ-
         ations where disk space is exhausted, etc.
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