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What does it do?

At first I thought it was a shorthand way of doing Math.max()
Every time I did (1 | 0) or (0 | 2985235), I got back the larger number.
However, I was wrong, as I soon found out when I posted this question with the example:
(128|256|0) which does not evaluate to 256.

Thanks for the helpful replies.

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(128|256|0) evaluates to 384. (← comment left before the question was rewritten; original question asked whether (128|256|0) is a "shorthand" for Math.max(128, 256, 0).) –  Juhana May 25 '13 at 9:34
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It's a bitwise OR en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation –  Bart May 25 '13 at 9:37
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Please go back to documentation, always go back to the documentation if you're unsure about something. –  Shane Hsu May 25 '13 at 9:41
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@Juhana Yes, my bad. Google didn't bring up many relevant results when searching Javascript and the "|" character. –  Joncom May 25 '13 at 9:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

| is a bitwise OR operator. To see what it does, consider the binary form of the numbers:

128 = 010000000
256 = 100000000
0   = 000000000

The result is from performing OR bit-by-bit

384 = 110000000

I guess you might encounter this pattern in the logic to represent options. For example,

128 = option 1
256 = option 2
384 = both option 1 & 2
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Thank you for the example. –  Joncom May 25 '13 at 9:40

| is a bitwise operator in Javascript. So before evaluating those integers, first convert them to binary.

  0 -> 000000000
128 -> 010000000
256 -> 100000000

There might be more preceding zeros depending on your data types. Anyway | as a bitwise OR operator, will evaluate each bit from those two integers.

So you will get 110000000 as an result, which is 384 in decimal.

P.S. OR operation: if any one of those hold true, then true.

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