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I'm trying to use in Python 3.3 an old library (dating from 2003!). When I import it, Python throws me an error because there are <> signs in the source file, e.g.:

if (cnum < 1000 and nnum <> 1000 and ntext[-1] <> "s":
    ...

I guess it's a now-abandoned sign in the language.

What exactly does it mean, and which (more recent) sign should I replace it with?

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3  
I would like to note that it is clearly not a Python 3.3 library, but a Python 2.x library. –  Lattyware May 25 '13 at 11:37
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2  
@GrijeshChauhan In 3.x, that's not true. As noted in answers below, it's not just obsolete, it's not valid syntax at all. –  Lattyware May 25 '13 at 11:42
    
Reminds me of comparisons in ML. –  squiguy May 25 '13 at 19:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 68 down vote accepted

It means not equal to. It was taken from ABC (python's predecessor) see here:

x < y, x <= y, x >= y, x > y, x = y, x <> y, 0 <= d < 10

Order tests (<> means 'not equals')

I believe ABC took it from Pascal, a language Guido began programming with.

It has now been removed in Python 3. Use != instead. If you are CRAZY you can scrap != and allow only <> in Py3K using this easter egg:

>>> from __future__ import barry_as_FLUFL
>>> 1 <> 2
True
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32  
Funny how it's in the __future__ module... –  Volatility May 25 '13 at 11:36
8  
the __future__ import does not "get it back in Python3". It effectively replaces !=. After doing that import the expression 1 != 2 raises a SyntaxError. –  Bakuriu May 25 '13 at 18:12
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Actually, it's not historical. It was a 1st April joke. See PEP-401. –  kirelagin May 25 '13 at 19:48
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Just a link to a relevant question: So what exactly does “from future import barry_as_FLUFL” do? –  Alvin Wong May 26 '13 at 7:19

It means NOT EQUAL, but it is deprecated, use != instead.

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17  
More than deprecated: in Python 3, it is a syntax error, as the questioner discovered. –  lvc May 25 '13 at 11:35
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Why would somebody add -1 for an accepted question? Comment please, so I could fix the problem, if there is any.. –  Peter Varo May 25 '13 at 12:50
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@PeterVaro I upvoted yours, but in general (not in this case!) an answer being accepted is not a reason not to downvote it if the downvoter considers it bad and the accepting a bad desicion (again, which does not apply in this case). –  glglgl May 25 '13 at 19:38
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That said, I as well would like to know the reason for the -1 in this case - the answer is perfectly valid and correct. –  glglgl May 25 '13 at 19:39

It is an old way of spelling !=, that was removed in Python 3. A library old enough to use it likely runs into various other incompatibilities with Python 3 as well: it is probably a good idea to run it through 2to3, which automatically changes this, among many other things.

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It's NOT EQUAL TO....See bellow:


  • == Checks if the value of two operands are equal or not, if yes then condition becomes true. (a == b) is not true.

  • != Checks if the value of two operands are equal or not, if values are not equal then condition becomes true. (a != b) is true.

  • <> Checks if the value of two operands are equal or not, if values are not equal then condition becomes true. (a <> b) is true. This is similar to != operator.

  • > Checks if the value of left operand is greater than the value of right operand, if yes then condition becomes true. (a > b) is not true.

  • < Checks if the value of left operand is less than the value of right operand, if yes then condition becomes true. (a < b) is true.

  • >= Checks if the value of left operand is greater than or equal to the value of right operand, if yes then condition becomes true. (a >= b) is not true.

  • <= Checks if the value of left operand is less than or equal to the value of right operand, if yes then condition becomes true. (a <= b) is true.
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It's worth knowing that you can use Python itself to find documentation, even for punctuation mark operators that Google can't cope with.

>>> help("<>")

Comparisons

Unlike C, all comparison operations in Python have the same priority, which is lower than that of any arithmetic, shifting or bitwise operation. Also unlike C, expressions like a < b < c have the interpretation that is conventional in mathematics:

Comparisons yield boolean values: True or False.

Comparisons can be chained arbitrarily, e.g., x < y <= z is equivalent to x < y and y <= z, except that y is evaluated only once (but in both cases z is not evaluated at all when x < y is found to be false).

The forms <> and != are equivalent; for consistency with C, != is preferred; where != is mentioned below <> is also accepted. The <> spelling is considered obsolescent.

See http://docs.python.org/2/reference/expressions.html#not-in

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2  
This also appears in python 3 (well, something different for me). How strange. +1 –  Haidro May 29 '13 at 12:44

protected by Ashwini Chaudhary May 26 '13 at 12:02

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