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It's well known that operator= should return a const reference to *this to support chaining, but this only works if *this can be used as an rvalue is value-like.

Edit: Fine, operator= should return a non-const reference (do as the ints), and I meant that *this needs to be a meaningful rhs in an assignment.

I'm wrapping a C API of name=value setter functions through a C++ class ApiWrapper with operator[] returning a temporary write-only Proxy with overloaded operator=, but the API has no getter functions so Proxy is effectively write-only.

ApiWrapper x;
x["a"] = x["b"] = 42;  // x["b"] = 42;      fine:  consumes 42, returns *this
                       // x["a"] = x["b"];  error: x["b"] does not have the value

It seems to me that if I return a const reference to rhs instead of *this from operator=, chaining would work fine. Conceptually (proxy boilerplate code left out):

struct Proxy {
    template <typename T>
    T const& operator=(T const& rhs) const
    {
        ...         // pass rhs to the API but don't store it
        return rhs; // return rhs, not *this
    }
};

ApiWrapper x;
x["a"] = x["b"] = 42;  // x["b"] = 42;   fine: consumes and returns 42
                       // x["a"] = 42;   fine: consumes and returns 42

This makes me suspicious though. Are there any weird side effects from returning a const reference to rhs instead of *this? The only thing I can think of is that I won't be able to use it in expressions like (x["a"] = 42).doSomething() but my Proxy cannot support anything like that anyway, since it is write-only. Or would it be better to just disallow chaining (e.g. by returning void)?

Edit: Even if Proxy is not value-like, I think supporting assignment makes sense, it allows syntactic sugar like:

// this:                          // rather than:
ApiWrapper w;                     API * ptr = make_api_instance();
w["name"] = "Batman";             api_set_str(ptr, "name", "Batman");
w["age"]  = 42;                   api_set_int(ptr, "age", 42);
w["pi"]   = 3.14;                 api_set_double(ptr, "pi", 3.14);
share|improve this question
    
The copy assignment operator should return a non-const reference. – Captain Obvlious May 25 '13 at 12:05
1  
How can operator = be const? – Andy Prowl May 25 '13 at 12:05
    
Your opening statement doesn't really make sense. First off, assignment can't be const and neither should the return value be. Second, *this is always an lvalue (since it's dereferencing a pointer), and there's always the standard lvalue-to-rvalue conversion. – Kerrek SB May 25 '13 at 12:06
    
@CaptainObvlious, if operator= returns a non-const reference, you allow (a=b)=c; , see eg stackoverflow.com/questions/4706690/…. – Anders Johansson May 25 '13 at 12:07
1  
@jogojapan IMHO that's a careless attitude and one reason UB happens as often as it does. If you need to pass a temporary add a move assignment operator. – Captain Obvlious May 25 '13 at 13:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think your approach makes sense. Just to check if I understand your problem correctly, the struct could look something like this:

struct Proxy {
    template <typename T>
    T const& operator=(T const& rhs) const
    {
        send_to_abi(rhs);
        return rhs;
    }
};

As you say, since Proxy does not store rhs anywhere, and I'm assuming no receive_from_abi function exists, then returning *this will not work - the number would not be propagated in this case. As the comments point out, some behaviors such as (a=3)=3 will not work, but that isn't really surprising.

Edit: As the comments point out, this approach is dangerous if rhs is a temporary. This can be fixed by returning a copy instead:

struct Proxy {
    template <typename T>
    T operator=(T const& rhs) const
    {
        send_to_abi(rhs);
        return rhs;
    }
};

This might appear expensive a["a"] = a["b"] = a["c"] = foo looks like it would involve 3 copies. But these should be avoidable through a common compiler optmimization.

share|improve this answer
    
const Proxy& a = b = Proxy(); a.BlowUp(); – Captain Obvlious May 25 '13 at 12:29
    
Yes that is exactly it - rhs is passed to another function but not stored and not retrievable later. However Captain Obvlious is right, I can't return rhs if it's a temporary. – Anders Johansson May 25 '13 at 12:30
    
Yes, he's right. You could return a copy, which would not necessarily be expensive. The other solution also involves copies, but it is easier for the compiler to optimize copies when returning than internally stored copies when they occur in this kind of chain, I think. So how about using this approach, but changing the signature to T operator=(T const& rhs) const? Of course, that would not work for objects without a copy constructor. – amaurea May 25 '13 at 12:42
    
Accepting this answer since it is more in line with the spirit of what I'm asking for in the question (though after the discussion, I'm leaning more toward just disallowing chaining instead). Thanks! – Anders Johansson May 26 '13 at 13:25

I think the cleanest solution would be to stick with the standard idioms. If you make your proxy class copy-constructible and copy-assignable in the usual way, this should work. Something like this:

struct Proxy
{
    Proxy(Proxy const & rhs)
    : // ...
    {
        // copy internal state of rhs
    }

    Proxy & operator=(Proxy const & rhs)
    {
        // copy internal state of rhs
        return *this;
    }

    template <typename T>
    Proxy & operator=(T const & rhs)
    {
        // ... perform T-specific operations ... #1
        return *this;
    }
};

An additional benefit is that whatever "generic logic" has to be performed by the first assignment at #1 doesn't need to be repeated in every subsequent assignment.

share|improve this answer
    
The internal state of the proxy is just the parent API wrapper and the name of the property. With the above x["name"] = x["address"] would make the proxy for "name" refer to the same property as the proxy for "address" does, which is not correct. – Anders Johansson May 25 '13 at 12:24
    
He is a bit unclear, but I interpreted this as adding an extra variable to Proxy, which would store the last assigned value. When assigning a proxy to a proxy, the stored value in the RHS proxy (42 in this case) would then be used. It is a bit redundant (42 being stored both in Proxy and in the underlying api. – amaurea May 25 '13 at 12:36
    
@amaurea, nice idea but it counteracts the point of the proxy (which is to accept assignment of any type and call the correct API function depending on that type). To store the value, Proxy would have to be a template class instead of operator= being a template function, and ApiWrapper::operator[] would have to return Proxy objects of the correct type. Alternatively use boost::any or void* or something ugly like that. – Anders Johansson May 25 '13 at 12:47

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