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For example;

  data TRAINING=AGAIN Int [TRAINING]
                |RUN
                |JUMP
                |PUNCH Int 
           deriving (Eq,Show,Read)

is defined and i want that if the User enters something like;

  "RUN, PUNCH 15, AGAIN 3 [JUMP, AGAIN 2 [PUNCH 20]]"

then the program should return

  [RUN,PUNCH 15,AGAIN 3 [JUMP,AGAIN 2 [PUNCH 20]]]

So i wrote

  fight :: String->[TRAINING]
  fight xs=[read xs ::TRAINING]

but i am getting no parse Exception.I am novice and i want to know what no parse Exception is and how i can fix it ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A no parse exception means that what you gave Haskell isn't the correct pattern for the instance of Read. In this case it's because list's are shown like this:

[<show element>,<show element>...]

And you're missing the outer brackets. Fixing it is as easy as seeing what the output should be:

Prelude> show [RUN,PUNCH 15,AGAIN 3 [JUMP,AGAIN 2 [PUNCH 20]]]
         "[RUN,PUNCH 15,AGAIN 3 [JUMP,AGAIN 2 [PUNCH 20]]]"

So you need to surround the whole thing with []'s. Your function is right, you just have a slightly incorrect input string.

If you don't like this restriction, it may be time to just write a simple parser with Parsec or similar. Though this might be a bit challenging if you're totally new to Haskell.

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Spaces around the commas don't hurt, read can handle those fine. –  Daniel Fischer May 25 '13 at 12:24
    
Really? Thank you edited –  jozefg May 25 '13 at 12:25
    
Although I like Parsec, it wouldn't be challenging to write a recursive descent parser by hand for this, just slightly tedious. –  Wes May 25 '13 at 12:32
    
@Wes I'm more thinking of someone who's new enough to haskell they don't know what a no parse exception is. Just getting up and running parsec in the first place would be the most challenging part –  jozefg May 25 '13 at 12:35
1  
en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Write_Yourself_a_Scheme_in_48_Hours/… This has an explanation of a scheme parser which is pretty close to the sort of parser you'd be writing. book.realworldhaskell.org/read/using-parsec.html Is more in depth but it expects a bit more knowledge going in. –  jozefg May 25 '13 at 12:45

In other words, following jozefg's answer:

fight xs = read xs ::[TRAINING]

and also:

"[RUN, PUNCH 15, AGAIN 3 [JUMP, AGAIN 2 [PUNCH 20]]]"
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but this doesnt fix actually –  nbdip May 25 '13 at 12:46
    
@nbdip That's interesting...setting fight xs = read xs ::[TRAINING] and typing fight "[RUN, PUNCH 15, AGAIN 3 [JUMP, AGAIN 2 [PUNCH 20]]]" is the only way that worked for me, using your data structure. How did you fix it? –  גלעד ברקן May 25 '13 at 13:01

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