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Imagine a module called base with a class called Base in it. Now inside an other module, called sub, inherit a class Sub from Base:

import base
class Sub(base.Base):
    pass

Now what if we add a third class, that inherits from Sub and takes a parameter that has to be type of Base or one of it's subclasses:

import sub
class Deep(sub.Sub):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        if isinstance(parent, sub.base.Base):
            pass

Going deeper and deeper down in the inheritance tree, the path to Base will become thedeepest.deeperanddeeper.reallydeep.deep.sub.base.Base, which nobody would like.

I could of course just do from base import * and from sub import * and then just use Base, but is there a way to import so that I can use the prefix of ONLY the original module of my class?

For example:

import deep
class ReallyDeep(deep.Deep):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        # I know my polymorphism, this is just an example.
        if isinstance(parent, sub.Sub):
            pass
        elif isinstance(parent, base.Base):
            pass
share|improve this question
    
Why access Base through a chain of modules defining subclasses of Base, rather than immediately through base? Apart from that, no inheritance hierarchy should be deeper than a couple of classes. (Whether "couple" means 2 or up to 5 here is up to you; I lean towards 2.) –  delnan May 25 '13 at 14:23
    
@delnan base is already imported in the submodules, why import it again? Unless python has a built-in #ifndef, in which case this question is useless. Inheritance tree should be two to five classes deep, and rather two? OS X (and all the large projects) must've been coded badly... core-plot.googlecode.com/hg-history/… –  user2032433 May 25 '13 at 14:58
1  
Modules are indeed never imported twice. Perhaps you should re-read the tutorial. RE inheritance depth: The specific number is both a rule of thumb and an absolute, and Python-specific (quite often, you should have zero classes where you would have one class in another language). A related principle (favor composition over inheritance) holds in all OO languages though, and is indeed sometimes disregarded. Being large doesn't make a code base good. –  delnan May 25 '13 at 15:16
    
@delnan Thank you for "Modules are indeed never imported twice.". I'm just gonna ignore the rest of your comment cause you seem to have no idea what you're talking about :) –  user2032433 May 25 '13 at 16:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Modules in Python are like singletons, they only get imported once, so

import base
import deep
class ReallyDeep(deep.Deep):
    def __init__(self, parent):
       if isinstance(parent, base.Base):
           pass

Is absolutely no problem at all, in fact, it's the best way to do it.

What delnan means is that in most cases deeply nested inheritance trees are a sign of bad design. As with any rule, there are exceptions. But in general avoiding deeply nested trees will make your code more understandable, easier to test and therefore easier to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
This would be a perfect answer if you didn't start thrash talking about the depth of inheritance. You're both wrong about it, and it was not my question. –  user2032433 May 25 '13 at 16:42
    
Glad to be of service, I always enjoy helping out hostile people ... –  Blubber May 26 '13 at 7:57

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