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I was trying to create a simple random number guessing game. The problem is even if I type the correct number it replies with a 'The number is less than'. Can somebody provide me a solution for this one ?

Thanks in advance

import random
import sys

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
user = raw_input('Guess The Number\n Pick between 1 - 10\n >>> ')
try:
    int(user)
except:
    print "Numbers Only !"
    sys.exit(0)
number = random.choice(numbers)
int(number)
for i in range(0, 4):
    if number == user:
        print 'You Won!'
    if user > number:
        print 'The number is less than', user
        user = raw_input('>>> ')
        try:
            int(user)
        except:
            print "Numbers Only !"
    if user < number:
        print 'The number is bigger than', user
        user = raw_input('>>> ')
        int(user)

print "The Number was", number
share|improve this question
    
You can have a look at a solution done using functions at <github.com/hjupadhyay/guessthenumber/>; –  hjupadhyay Sep 8 '13 at 16:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The biggest problem is that you're not saving the conversion to int so you're using the guess as the string the user entered. You need to save it by doing user = int(raw_input('>>>'))

There are other ways you can improve this code, however. You repeat yourself a bit, and you don't need random.choice, you can use random.randrange(1, 10)

You shouldn't just say except:. You wanna only catch the exceptions you are looking for. The particular exception you are looking for is a ValueError

Additionally, I suggest you let the user try again when they enter something that's not a number. You can wrap up the whole thing in it's own function.

import random

def get_user_num(msg='>>> '): 
    """Print the msg parameter as a prompt for the user to enter a number.  If
    they enter an invalid string, reprompt them until they enter a number.

    """
    while True: 
        try: 
            return int(raw_input(msg)) # save the conversion to int
        except ValueError: # only except the error you're actually looking for
            print 'Numbers Only!' 

# 'from 1-9' is probably better than 'between 1-10'
user = get_user_num('Guess The Number\n Pick from 1-9\n>>> ') 
number = random.randrange(1, 10) # <- numbers list is unnecessary
#int(number) # this conversion was never needed, it was already a number

for _ in range(4):  # you don't need (0, 4), 0 is assumed 
    if number == user:
        print 'You Won!' # the correct number has been guessed
        break # exit the loop once the number has been correctly guessed
    elif user > number:
        print 'The number is less than', user
    elif user < number:
        print 'The number is bigger than', user

    # Don't repeat yourself, put this outside the `if`s
    user = get_user_num()
else:
    #only print the answer when it wasn't guessed correctly
    print "The Number was", number
share|improve this answer
1  
This deserves many more upvotes for going way above and beyond the call of duty :) –  Tim Pietzcker May 25 '13 at 16:07
    
randrange(1, 10) returns integers in [1, 9]. You might mean randint(1, 10) or "Pick between 1 - 10" is misleading. –  J.F. Sebastian May 25 '13 at 18:59
    
@J.F.Sebastian I realized this as well, but OP's list is [1..9] and I didn't wanna change his string. I would suggest changing it to 'Pick a number from 1-9' –  Ryan Haining May 25 '13 at 21:12
1  
Thanks for all your feedback. It is much appreciated. –  user2420593 May 26 '13 at 14:19
    
nitpicking, but: True has to be capitalized, and I believe "user = int(raw_input(msg))" could be "return int(raw_input(msg))" as the statement is evaluated before trying to return –  Joe Tannenbaum May 7 at 6:33

When you convert to int(user), you aren't saving a new int to user. So user still remains a string.

What you need to do is

user = int(user)

By the way, this is for all of the places where you use int(user)

share|improve this answer

This could be done with a much simpler implementation:

import random

number = random.randrange(10)
for i in xrange(4):
    try:
        user = int(raw_input('guess: '))
    except ValueError:
        print 'must be int'
        continue
    if user == number:
        print 'bravo'
        break
    elif user < number:
        print 'greater'
    else:
        print 'lesser'
print 'it was: %d' % number
share|improve this answer
2  
random.randrange is all you need to pick a number. You need a continue at the end of the except block –  Ryan Haining May 25 '13 at 16:32
    
thanks, I fix that. –  Peter Varo May 25 '13 at 16:34

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