Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am starting studying OOP and I want to learn what constitutes a class. I am a little confused at how loosely some core elements are being used and thus adding to my confusion.

I have looked at the C++ class, the java class and I want to know enough to write my own pseudo class to help me understand.

For instance in this article I read this (.. class attribute (or class property, field, or data member)

I have seen rather well cut out questions that show that there is a difference between class property and class field for instance What is the difference between a field and a property in C#?

Depending on what language I am studying, is the definition of

  • Property
  • Fields
  • Class variables
  • Attributes

different from language to language?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

"Fields", "class variables", and "attributes" are more-or-less the same - a low-level storage slot attached to an object. Each language's documentation might use a different term consistently, but most actual programmers use them interchangeably. (However, this also means some of the terms can be ambiguous, like "class variable" - which can be interpreted as "a variable of an instance of a given class", or "a variable of the class object itself" in a language where class objects are something you can manipulate directly.)

"Properties" are, in most languages I use, something else entirely - they're a way to attach custom behaviour to reading / writing a field. (Or to replace it.)

So in Java, the canonical example would be:

class Circle {

    // The radius field
    private double radius;
    public Circle(double radius) {
        this.radius = radius;
    }

    // The radius property
    public double getRadius() {
        return radius;
    }
    public double setRadius(double radius) {
        // We're doing something else besides setting the field value in the 
        // property setter
        System.out.println("Setting radius to "+radius);
        this.radius = radius;
    }

    // The circumference property, which is read-only
    public double getCircumference() {
        // We're not even reading a field here.
        return 2 * Math.PI * radius;
    }

}

(Note that in Java, a property foo is a pair of accessor methods called getFoo() and setFoo() - or just the getter if the property is read-only.)

share|improve this answer
1  
One exception: In Python, "class variable" refers to a member of a class object (which other languages call a static variable/member/field). –  delnan May 25 '13 at 15:56
    
@delnan Added that in, the ambiguity is probably a caveat for any language with types as first-class objects. ("Types are first-class objects" is also probably the most confusing possible sentence to have to explain to a OOP newbie.) –  millimoose May 25 '13 at 16:07

I've been doing oop for more than 20 years, and I find that people often use different words for the same things. My understanding is that fields, class variables and attributes all mean the same thing. However, property is best described by the stackoverflow link that you included in your question.

share|improve this answer

Generally fields, methods, static methods, properties, attributes and class (or static variables) do not change on a language basis... Although the syntax will probably change on a per language basis, they will be function in the way you would expect across languages (expect terms like fields/data members to be used interchangably across languages)

In C#....

A field is a variable that exists for a given instance of a class.

eg.

public class BaseClass
{
    // This is a field that might be different in each instance of a class
    private int _field; 

    // This is a property that accesses a field
    protected int GetField
    {
        get
        {
            return _field;
        }
    }
}

Fields have a "visibility" this determines what other classes can see the field, so in the above example a private field can only be used by the class that contains it, but the property accessor provides readonly access to the field by subclasses.

A property lets you get (sometimes called an accessor) or set (sometimes called a mutator) the value of field... Properties let you do a couple of things, prevent writing a field for example from outside the class, change the visibility of the field (eg private/protected/public). A mutator allows you to provide some custom logic before setting the value of a field

So properties are more like methods to get/set the value of a field but provide more functionality

eg.

public class BaseClass
{
    // This is a field that might be different in each instance of a class
    private int _field; 

    // This is a property that accesses a field, but since it's visibility 
    // is protected only subclasses will know about this property 
    // (and through it the field) - The field and property in this case
    // will be hidden from other classes.
    protected int GetField
    {
        // This is an accessor
        get
        {
            return _field;
        }
        // This is a mutator
        set
        {
            // This can perform some more logic
            if (_field != value) 
            {
                 Console.WriteLine("The value of _field changed");
                 _field = value;
                 OnChanged; // Call some imaginary OnChange method
            } else {
                 Console.WriteLine("The value of _field was not changed");
            }
        }
    }
}

A class or static variable is a variable which is the same for all instances of a class.. So, for example, if you wanted a description for a class that description would be the same for all instance of the class and could be accessed by using the class eg.

public class BaseClass
{
    // A static (or class variable) can be accessed from anywhere by writing
    // BaseClass.DESCRIPTION
    public static string DESCRIPTION = "BaseClass";
}

public class TestClass
{
    public void Test()
    {
        string BaseClassDescription = BaseClass.DESCRIPTION;
    }
}

I'd be careful when using terminology relating to an attribute. In C# it is a class that can be applied to other classes or methods by "decorating" the class or method, in other context's it may simply refer to a field that a class contains.

// The functionality of this attribute will be documented somewhere
[Test]
public class TestClass
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod()
    {
    }
}

Some languages do not have "Attributes" like C# does (see above)

Hopefully that all makes sense... Don't want to overload you!

share|improve this answer

Firstly, you need to select a language. For example, I would recommend you to select Ruby language and community. Until you select a language, you cannot escape confusion, as different communities use different terms for the same things.

For example, what is known as Module in Ruby, Java knows as abstract class. What is known as attributes in some languages, is known as instance variables in Ruby. I recommend Ruby especially for its logical and well-designed OOP system.

Write the following in a *.rb file, or on the command line in irb (interactive Ruby interpreter):

class Dog                         # <-- Here you define a class representing all dogs.
  def breathe                     # <-- Here you teach your class a method: #breathe
    puts "I'm breathing."
  end

  def speak                       # <-- Here you teach your class another method: #speak
    puts "Bow wow!"
  end
end

Now that you have a class, you can create an instance of it:

Seamus = Dog.new

You have just created an instance, a particular dog of class Dog, and stored it in the constant Seamus. Now you can play with it:

Seamus.breathe                   # <-- Invoking #breathe instance method of Seamus
#=> I'm breathing.
Seamus.speak                     # <-- Invoking #speak instance method of Seamus
#=> Bow wow!

As for your remaining terminology questions, "property" or "attribute" is understood as "variable" in Ruby, almost always an instance variable. And as for the term "data member", just forget about it. The term "field" is not really used in Ruby, and "class variable" in Ruby means something very rarely used, which you definitely don't need to know at this moment.

So, to keep the world nice and show you that OOP is really simple and painless in Ruby, let us create an attribute, or, in Ruby terminology, an instance variable of Dog class. As we know, every dog has some weight, and different dogs may have different weights. So, upon creation of a new dog, we will require the user to tell us dog's weight:

class Dog
  def initialize( weight )  # <-- Defining initialization method with one argument 'weight'
    @weight = weight        # <-- Setting the dog's attribute (instance variable)
  end
  attr_reader :weight       # <-- Making the dog's weight attribute visible to the world.
end

Drooly = Dog.new( 16 )      # <-- Weight now must provide weight upon initialization.
Drooly.weight               # <-- Now we can ask Drooly about his weight.
#=> 16

Remember, with Ruby (or Python), things are simple.

share|improve this answer
    
Any problem with my examples? –  Boris Stitnicky May 26 '13 at 11:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.