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With HTML like this:

<div id="container">                                                                                 
  <p>Lorem ipsum lorem ipsum
    <p>This is the second!
      <span data-attribute="my-span">Hello World</span>
    </p>
  </p>
</div> 

I want to find the text length from the container down to my span. So by counting the indicies of the descendants I get a correct answer of 42.

But if I have HTML like this:

  <div id="container">                                                                                 
      <p>Lorem ipsum lorem ipsum
        <p>This is the second!
          <span data-attribute="my-span">Hello World</span>
        </p>
        Some preceding HTML that I dont want!
      </p>
    </div> 

I do not want the character count proceeding my span. I only want character counts up to my span, so the correct answer is still 42. But by counting the child text length it also adds in the preceding text, and the span's text (which is easy enough to get rid of by just subtracting that from the total).

I've explored listing the html and sub-stringing up to the span attribute I want, splitting off the end and parsing out the html, leaving only the text characters I want to count. But that seems overly complicated.

I'm also considering using something like wicked good xpath to find all the nodes up to the one I'm looking for then sum up the text.

I've also looked at just listing all the text nodes up to a certain point and summing them, but it lists the child's preceding text before my span's text, so it not in the correct order for summing.

Also, the nestings could be n levels deep, so dont assume just one level.

Any advice on the best way to achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
I think the easiest way is to start at the bottom and work your way back up in a while loop. Select the span, and keep tallying the parents until you get to the container div. –  shaun5 May 25 '13 at 16:30
    
@shaun5 the parents will be inclusive of that text -- and the spans text, so a more sophisticated approach with node counting is necessary, like Jans solution. –  bwvoss May 26 '13 at 17:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option that's always available is to traverse the DOM tree manually. jQuery is not exactly good at handling non-element nodes (it seems that all children's descendants are listed after all children of each node when we do .find('*').contents(), and contents is the only method that sees these nodes), but we can still use the native API. Also note that handling whitespace is tricky here (I assume you want collapsing whitespace to mimic the renderer behavior) Something like this:

function countCharsUntil(parent, selector, inclusive){
  var done = false;
  return listChars(parent).replace(/\s+/g," ").trim().length;

  function listChars(elem){
    var cn = elem.childNodes;
    var chars = "";
    if(!inclusive && $(elem).is(selector)){
      done = true;
      return ""
    }
    for(var i=0; i<cn.length && !done; i++){
      var child = cn[i];
      switch(child.nodeType){
        case Node.ELEMENT_NODE:
          chars += listChars(child);
          break;
        case Node.TEXT_NODE:
          chars += child.nodeValue;
          break;
      }
    }
    if(inclusive && $(elem).is(selector)){
      done = true;
      return chars;
    }
    return chars;
  }
}

Test: http://jsfiddle.net/8hxb6/1/

Note the test returns 43 characters for the exclusive search. This is probably because you neglect the space between "ipsum" inside div>p and "This" inside div>p>p

share|improve this answer
    
lol +1, this like google's monkey solution –  Sam May 25 '13 at 16:44

This work man

$(document).ready(function(){
  var tx = $('#container').text().split($('#container span').text())[0].replace(/[\s]{2,}/g,'');
  console.log(tx.length); //42
});

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
nice trick, but what if the span text is also present somewhere outside the span? Then it will break! –  Jan Dvorak May 25 '13 at 16:34
    
@JanDvorak he can change the split index and join some of them, however this is a base :P –  Sam May 25 '13 at 16:36
    
What if you don't know how many times the text is present? I don't think this can be made to work. –  Jan Dvorak May 25 '13 at 16:39
    
@JanDvorak you can see the split length for know it –  Sam May 25 '13 at 16:42
1  
@JanDvorak is right that a text comparison approach is fragile. If I include a 'Hello World' before my original, then it will find the indicies to that one instead. But I do like the approach. –  bwvoss May 26 '13 at 17:42

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