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Please help me understand this example program in C.

#include <stdio.h>
int i;
int *tmp;
void anotherFunction(void);
void destroyStack(int);
void main(void)
{
 anotherFunction();
 fprintf(stderr,
 "We will never reach this far\n");
}
void anotherFunction(void)
{
 destroyStack(4);
 fprintf(stderr,"In another function\n");
}
void destroyStack(int param)
{
 tmp = &param;
 for(i = -200; i < 10; i++)
 /* overwrite part of stack*/
 printf("%d\n",param), tmp[i] = 0;
}

AFAIK tmp is a pointer to an int and it gets treated like an array, why is it so? What is the author trying to illustrate with this example called "destroying the stack" ? When is it a good idea to use a pointer like an array? Is it strictly legal to program like that?

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Have you tried to debug the application (e.g., gdb, valgrind, what observations did you make)? What do you know about accessing arbitrary memory regions? Have you tried to reason about your own questions? –  moooeeeep May 25 '13 at 17:26
    
Because int param is local to function destroyStack() the address of param is on stack. but because i = -200 , temp[i] try to access and write on memory below in stack where other variables and function addresses are stored e.g destroyStack address. syntactically you code is correct but then you runs this code it will rise a signal that causes process terminal and you may get a segment fault -- its Undefined behavior in C –  Grijesh Chauhan May 25 '13 at 17:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
tmp = &param;
tmp[i] = 0;

Results in writing to a memory location which is not owned. This results in Undefined behavior. This might destroy the stack as the author says or work perfectly fine. It is just not a valid C program.

What is the author trying to illustrate with this example called "destroying the stack" ?

Obviously, S/He is trying to demonstrate destroying the stack. The intent seems to be to write beyond the bounds of memory so that it possibly corrupts the stack. However, this being UB it may or maynot result in that.

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2  
this is a C program anyway ;) –  moooeeeep May 25 '13 at 17:32
    
@moooeeeep: Doesn't change the answer apart from dropping the ++ after C :-) –  Alok Save May 25 '13 at 17:35
    
Besides that, I agree with you entirely! –  moooeeeep May 25 '13 at 17:38
    
It is a valid C. You can run it in a real mode say on 8086 and it would work fine. Well, rather "fine", as it would still crash. AFAIR, on 8086 the stack segment is deployed right before code segment by default, so destroyStack would just mess a bit with our code we would never reach back anyway. –  akalenuk May 25 '13 at 18:01
    
@akalenuk:It runs fine on platform xyz does not make it valid. It is Undefined Behavior, From the perspective of the language standard the behavior cannot be defined.Period. –  Alok Save May 25 '13 at 18:12

Here we are mainly interested in 3 things

A declaration of an int i, a pointer to int tmp, as global variables (not in the stack)

int i;
int *tmp;

A call to function destroyStack with 4 as argument

destroyStack(4);

And the function destroyStack itself

void destroyStack(int param) 
{
  tmp = &param;
  for(i = -200; i < 10; i++)
  /* overwrite part of stack*/
  printf("%d\n",param), tmp[i] = 0;
}

The stack holds conveniently and temporarily a (usually) relatively low space for parameters, local variables and return address of a function, during its lifetime.
There is an internal stack pointer (located in a register in the CPU) that tells where we are at a given time in the stack - a memory space reserved for that usage.
When stack memory is "borrowed", like during a function call, the stack pointer is increased (for simplicity - actually on i386 it is decremented), and the stack pointer is back to where it was before the call when the function returns. This is convenient, as 1. there is no need of costly dynamic allocation (like via malloc) 2. the compiler knows at compilation time where are the parameters, local variables and return addresses - which are all relative to the stack pointer (+x or -x).

So what happens here, when destroyStack is called

  • the stack pointer is moved to make space for the return address (of destroyStack), and the 4 parameter (no local variable)
  • then the processor "jumps" to the code of destroyStack
  • tmp (global) takes the address of param (to display its value later)
  • and then, param, which is only the size of an int, gets "flooded" with 210 int values (ie 210 times what it can hold...). This is possible since C only needs a pointer (tmp) to work on a range of value (like an array).
  • thus, the stack space from -200 the size of an int below param up to 10 times above param - param included - are filled with 0.

What happens is that you should see the printf display 4 a number of times before it displays 0 (param being overwritten with 0 in the for loop) - and since the return address of destroyStack into anotherFunction (before the printf) is very likely to be also overwritten, the CPU will want to "jump" to an address being made of zeroes - usually a reserved area or, anyway, not reachable/accessible by a process - and generate an exception (crash).

The author used i and tmp as global variables (not local) so that they're not overwritten in the stack by destroyStack, ie the destruction can proceed as planned!

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The "param" being passed to a function, would come through stack. It just how it works: C stores a return address (some address to show the processor where to go after executing a function) and the parameters to the stack before calling a function. By getting address of "param" with & we simply get the head of a stack.

In the deployStack function we clear the stack a lot back and forth with the zeros. We can do that, why not.

But when deployStack goes to its end, the processor would line an address to go back to main. And it wouldn't get it, because we just erased it with 0.

What happens next depends heavily on the processor architecture, not even on the C standart. One thing is certain - we would not return to main. As it is directly said there.

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  • AFAIK tmp is a pointer to an int and it gets treated like an array, why is it so? Is it strictly legal to program like that?

It is legal. In C [] is operator which performs addition and dereferencing. Therefore

a[i]

is equal to

*(a + i)

You can even write 5[a] instead of a[5] because *(a + 5) is equal to *(5 + a).

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tmp is a pointer to an int and it gets treated like an array, why is it so?

tmp is effectively a single element integer array. The array element access operator can be seen as syntactic sugar for pointer arithmetics and dereferencing. As such a[b] is equivalent to *(a + b), and as a corollary b[a]. This is legal and perfectly fine unless invalid memory locations are being accessed: You shall not access memory regions that were not allocated for your variables.

What is the author trying to illustrate with this example called "destroying the stack" ?

The author tries to demonstrate what may happens when invalid memory regions are accessed. Technically, anything can happen. Nothing special included.

When is it a good idea to use a pointer like an array? Is it strictly legal to program like that?

Yes of course, this is a very common operation. You just have to know what array indices are valid (usually 0 to size-1). (You may need to pass the size alongside the pointer to the array: struct my_arr { int *arr; size_t size; };.)


(I don't think that the author wanted to demonstrate that the access violations in the lower memory regions are practically not a problem because that space on the stack wasn't used so far, but in contrast the access violations in the higher memory regions would overwrite besides the variable param, the return address of the function called and trigger stack corruption protection mechanisms (e.g., canaries) and thereby trigger a segmentation fault. But for anyone interested here's the obligatory link to Smashing The Stack For Fun And Profit by Aleph One.)

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