Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question is about trade-off between memory and performance.

I am doing C++ on Linux.

The for_loop () is on time critical path. I am tring to reduce its run time as much as possible.

myArray.assignMemory(); // the memory will be 50KB.
if (myFlag)
   myArray is assigned meaningful values
else
   myArray is assigned NotNumber (a very small negative number)

for_loop ( iterationNumber = N) {  // N will be very large
   myF1 ( myArray[i] ) ;  
}

myF1(double j){
  if(myFlag)
    use j
 else
   doNothing
}

Here, assign memory to myArray even though myFlag is false, in which case the memory is wasted. But, if I put if(myFlag) in the for_loop, this will have performance overhead.

I can put if(myFlag) out of for_loop so that if myFlag is true we run myF1( myArray[i]), otherwise, we run myF1(notNumber). But, this will have duplication.

So, my question is : are there other better ways that do not pull in performace overhead while not wasting any memory ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
To start with, you could mark myF1 as inline and hope the compiler optimizes the call away. Or possibly use a couple of threads, and partition the dataset between the threads. –  Joachim Pileborg May 25 '13 at 18:48
2  
According to the above code if (!myFlag) no further processing is required because myF1 will always do nothing in this case, is this correct? –  Adam Siemion May 25 '13 at 18:49
8  
How about starting with a profiler to find out exactly where the bottlenecks are? –  Captain Obvlious May 25 '13 at 18:51
    
Run code through profiler. Until you've done that, you're wasting your time. –  SigTerm May 25 '13 at 21:59

2 Answers 2

To me, from what I can see:

myArray.assignMemory(); // the memory will be 50KB.
if (myFlag)
   myArray is assigned meaningful values
else
   myArray is assigned NotNumber (a very small negative number)

for_loop ( iterationNumber = N) {  // N will be very large
   myF1 ( myArray[i] ) ;  
}

myF1(double j){
  if(myFlag)
    use j
 else
   doNothing
}

is the same as

if (myflag)
{
  myArray.assignMemory(); // the memory will be 50KB.
   myArray is assigned meaningful values

  for_loop ( iterationNumber = N) {  // N will be very large
     myF1 ( myArray[i] ) ;  
  }
}

myF1(double j){
    use j
}

Of course, it could be that your code does more things than what you describe, in which case this part of the answer is completely useless (but not really my fault - I can only go by what you have posted, and the posted code don't do anything else with myArray.

As to your DIRECT question, it really depends on what you are trying to achieve. 50KB is not a very large allocation (as long as you are not doing it several times). But allocating memory that you don't actually need is also completely meaningless AND takes time.

The title of your question is about "tradeoff between memory and performance", which is typically about "do I store something in lots of memory that is fast to access, or work out a more memory efficient way to store it, but taking more time." For example, if we have a telephone directory, we could have a very large array with all telephone numbers from 000000000 to 999999999 in one large, directly addressed array, or we can use a map or hash_map that stores only the items we actually need in the table. The directly addressed array is faster to access, but it's so much larger that it may not fit in the memory in most machines [if each record is large as well]. So it's a choice, do we make it "fast, using lots of memory", or do we make it "small memory, but not so fast". And like so many things, there's no directly right or wrong answer - it depends on which is more important, speed or memory space.

share|improve this answer

Call myArray.assignMemory() after checking MyFlag, but before the for_loop(). Depending on what myArray is assigned meaningful values and myArray is assigned NotNumber (a very small negative number) do, you might need to change the implementation of the class that myArray belongs to.

share|improve this answer
    
myArray class is not allowed to be changed. –  user2420472 May 25 '13 at 19:16
    
Let me rephrase that: depending on what myArray is assigned meaningful values and myArray is assigned NotNumber (a very small negative number) do, you might not even need to change the implementation of the class that myArray belongs to. –  Oswald May 26 '13 at 16:00
    
"myArray is assigned meaningful values" does assignment of a useful double number to myArray. Would you please tell me why your solution can solve the problem ? thanks ! –  user2420472 May 26 '13 at 17:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.