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I've extended Backbone's View prototype to include a "close" function in order to "kill the zombies", a technique I learned from Derrick Bailey's blog

The code looks like this:

Backbone.View.prototype.close = function () {
    this.remove();
    this.unbind();
    if (this.onClose) {
        this.onClose();
    }
};

Then I have a Router that looks (mostly) like this:

AppRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({

    initialize: function() {
        this.routesHit = 0;
        //keep count of number of routes handled by your application
        Backbone.history.on('route', function () { this.routesHit++; }, this);
    },

    back: function () {
        if(this.routesHit > 1) {
            //more than one route hit -> user did not land to current page directly
            logDebug("going window.back");
            window.history.back();
        } else {
            //otherwise go to the home page. Use replaceState if available so
            //the navigation doesn't create an extra history entry
            this.navigate('/', {trigger:true, replace:true});
        }
    },

    routes: {
        "": "showLoginView",
        "login": "showLoginView",
        "signUp": "showSignUpView"
    },

    showLoginView: function () {
        view = new LoginView();
        this.render(view);
    },

    showSignUpView: function () {
        view = new SignUpView();
        this.render(view);
    },

    render: function (view) {
        if (this.currentView) {
            this.currentView.close();
        }
        view.render();
        this.currentView = view;
        return this;
    }
});

The render function of my LoginView looks like this:

     render: function () {
        $("#content").html(this.$el.html(_.template($("#login-template").html())));
        this.delegateEvents();
        return this;
    }

The first time the LoginView is rendered, it works great. But if I render a different view (thereby calling "close" on my LoginView) and then try to go back to my LoginView, I get a blank screen. I know for a fact that the render on my LoginView fires the second time, but it seems that my "close" method is causing a problem. Any ideas?

EDIT After some feedback from Rayweb_on, it appears I should add more detail and clarify.

My HTML looks like this:

<div id="header">this is my header</div>
<div id="content">I want my view to render in here</div>
<div id="footer">this is my footer</div>

Then I have a login-template that looks like this (sort of):

<script type="text/template" id="login-template">
        <div id="login-view">
            <form>
               ...
            </form>
        </div>
</script>

I'm trying to get it so that the view always renders inside of that "content" div, but it appears that the call to "close" effectively removes the "content" div from the DOM. Hence the "blank" page. Any ideas?

EDIT 2 Here's what my LoginView looks like, after some noodling:

LoginView = Backbone.View.extend({
    events: {
        "vclick #login-button": "logIn"
    },

    el: "#content",

    initialize: function () {
        _.bindAll(this, "logIn");
    },

    logIn: function (e) {
       ...
    },


    render: function () {
        this.$el.html(_.template($("#login-template").html()));
        this.delegateEvents();
        return this;
    }

});

I set the el to "#content" in the hopes that it would get recreated. But still no luck. In fact, now when I go to the next page it's not there because #content is being removed right away.

I also tried:

LoginView = Backbone.View.extend({
    events: {
        "vclick #login-button": "logIn"
    },

    el: "#login-template",

    initialize: function () {
        _.bindAll(this, "logIn");
    },

    logIn: function (e) {
       ...
    },


    render: function () {
        this.$el.html(_.template($("#login-template").html()));
        this.delegateEvents();
        return this;
    }

});

But that doesn't work at all. Any ideas?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

When you remove your view the first time you are removing its el, so this line

 $("#content").html(this.$el.html(_.template($("#login-template").html())));

on your render function wont work. as this.$el. its undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont know your templates so I cant provide an aswer of how to handle it properly but I think $("#content").html(_.template($("#login-template").html())); should work... –  Rayweb_on May 25 '13 at 20:59
    
Thanks Rayweb_on. Your answer provided some insight and after a bit of experimentation, I have determined that the call to "close" appears to be removing $("#content") from the DOM. I tried: $("#content").html(_.template($("#login-template").html())); and it doesn't work. I'll edit my original post to provide some more insight. –  Bill Sparks May 25 '13 at 21:11
    
original post edited. –  Bill Sparks May 25 '13 at 21:19
    
In your loginView make sure you specify .el to #login-template. so whenever you call close the element removed is the div inserted by the template, this div can be reinserted from the template everytime. but the content dont. –  Rayweb_on May 25 '13 at 21:26
    
Sorry for not quite catching on. Do you mean to set el to #content in my LoginView ... I'll edit my original post again for more info. Thank you for your patience with me. –  Bill Sparks May 25 '13 at 21:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It would appear that any elements included in the view get destroyed (or at least removed from the DOM) by my "close" function (thanks Rayweb_on!). So, if I reference the #content div in my view, I lose it after the view is closed. Therefore, I no longer reference #content anywhere in my view. Instead, I add my view's default "el" to my #content element externally of my view.

In my case, I chose to do it in my router. The result looks like this:

ROUTER

    AppRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({

    initialize: function() {
     ...
    },

    routes: {
        "" : "showLoginView",
        "login": "showLoginView",
        "signUp": "showSignUpView",
    },

    showLoginView: function () {
        view = new LoginView();
        this.render(view);
    },

    showSignUpView: function () {
        view = new SignUpView();
        this.render(view);
    },

    render: function (view)
    {
        if (currentView)
        {
            currentView.close();
        }
        $("#content").html(view.render().el);
        currentView = view;
        return this;
    }

});

LOGIN VIEW

    LoginView = Backbone.View.extend({
    events: {
        "vclick #login-button": "logIn"
    },

    initialize: function () {
        _.bindAll(this, "logIn");
    },

    logIn: function (e) {
        ...
    },

    render: function () {
        this.$el.html(_.template($("#login-template").html()));
        this.delegateEvents();
        return this;
    }

});

This all works swimingly, but I am not certain it's the best solution. I'm not even certain it's a good solution, but it'll get me moving for now. I'm certainly open to other options.

====

EDIT: Found a slightly cleaner solution.

I wrote a function called injectView that looks like this:

function injectView(view, targetSelector) {
    if (_.isNull(targetSelector)) {
        targetSelector = "#content";
    }
    $(targetSelector).html(view.el);
}

and I call it from each View's render function, like this:

        render: function () {
        this.$el.html(_.template($("#login-template").html()));
        this.delegateEvents();
        injectView(this,"#content")
        return this;
    }

It works. I don't know how good it is. But it works.

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