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"block.h"

enum BlockType
{
    BlockType_Default = 0,
    BlockType_Grass,
};

class Block
{
public:
    Block();
    ~Block();

    bool IsActive();
    void SetActive(bool activeParameter);
private:
    bool active;
    BlockType m_blockType;
};

"block.cpp"

#include "block.h"

Block::Block()
{
    m_blockType = BlockType_Grass;
    active = true;
}

Block::~Block()
{

}

bool Block::IsActive()
{

     return active;
}

void Block::SetActive(bool activeParameter)
{
    active = activeParameter;
}

Here is my class. Now my problem is when I run the program and call the IsActive(); function, I get an error EXC_BAD_ACCESS (code=1, address = 0x0) on the line that checks if active is true. From what I read is what is returned if the variable doesn't exists. What is wrong with my code?

Here is where I call the function main.cpp

Block* m_pBlocks[32][32][32];

void main()
{
    for(int x = 0; x < 32; x++)
    {
        for(int y = 0; y < 32; y++)
        {
            for(int z = 0; z < 32; z++)
            {
                printf("x:%d y:%d z:%d",x,y,z);
                if(m_pBlocks[x][y][z]->IsActive())
                {
                    //DisplayBlock
                }
            }
        }
    }


}
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4  
Unrelated, but return active; –  chris May 25 '13 at 22:42
1  
You didn't paste the code that gets the error, your call to IsActive. Most likely, you're calling IsActive incorrectly, such as by dereferencing an uninitialized pointer. (And, as Chris pointed out, your horrible IsActive function can be rewritten as just return active;.) –  David Schwartz May 25 '13 at 22:51
1  
@chris: +1 for "Unrelated, but return active;" - and make it const –  Component 10 May 25 '13 at 23:04
1  
Are you actually instantiating objects for the pointers in m_pBlocks to point to? If not, then this is your problem. If so, then please show the code where you do that so we can see if the issue is there. –  Tyler McHenry May 26 '13 at 0:23
1  
@TylerMcHenry Listen to that little voice in the back of your head. You know what the answer is going to be ;) –  Captain Obvlious May 26 '13 at 0:35

1 Answer 1

This statement

Block* m_pBlocks[32][32][32];

defines 32 x 32 x 32 NULL pointers. So when you try -> on those NULL pointers, it fails.

You either need to create blocks, or allocate them:

Block m_pBlocks[32][32][32];

Block* m_pBlocks[32][32][32];
m_pBlocks[x][y][z] = new Block;
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