Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I have this method which needs to apply a lot of transforms on an image. In total I need several different operations applied to the same data. On my CPU code I do all these transforms on the same loop but I was wondering the best way to apply it in cuda.

So in CPU I have

loop 1
  loop 2
    loop 3
      DO A LOT OF SMALL BUT INDEPENDENT OPERATIONS
    end
  end
end

I use threading on the outermost loop with openmp and the algorithm accelerates almost times the number of threads so it is very paralelizable. Nonetheless for very big images it can still take a lot of time so I figured I can use Cuda.

So I managed to get rid of the outermost loops: loop 1 and loop 2 and replace every cicle with one cuda thread but now I'm not sure what is a better design

For example I tried doing this

cuda_kernel{

   loop 3
      DO A LOT OF SMALL BUT INDEPENDENT OPERATIONS
   end
}

Several of those operations have branching too and others don't. My question is if you think it is best on Cuda to do this instead

cuda_kernel 1{

   loop 3
      DO JUST FIRST OPERATION
   end
}

cuda_kernel 2{

   loop 3
      DO JUST SECOND OPERATION
   end
}


ETC

In this case each kernel will be greatly simplified but one will be called after the other serially and loop 3 will be repeated for each operation.

So what would you recommend to calculate everything at once or do each kernel separetely?

share|improve this question

A kernel call is very costy in terms of execution time. The more operations you stack into a single kernel call, the better performance improvement you get. I will actually do:

cuda_kernel {
 loop 2
   loop 3
    Do stuff here ...
   end
 end
}

This should be the fastest way to execute the whole thing. I used here two loops to show you that even if you have nested loops, do them inside the kernel instead of putting the kernel call in a loop. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
"A kernel call is very costy in terms of execution time"? On the platforms I use, it is about 10-15 microseconds. – talonmies May 26 '13 at 6:23
    
Man, 10-15 microseconds is still huge (Although I am confident about this number). If you think about a core clock of 800MHz, 10us is like 8000 clock cycles. That's a lot. Especially, if your kernel execution doesn't take that much time, you will dominated by kernel calls, which should not be the case. – Bichoy May 26 '13 at 19:11
    
Actually the kernels will only be called once each so I'm not too worried about it, there will be 32 different kernels, I can get rid of loop 2 altogether. But loop 3 within the kernels will be done many many times over instead of only once if I use the big kernel. Hence my question of which do you think will be more efficient. – Atirag May 27 '13 at 16:01
1  
I got it. I believe it will be more efficient to have one big kernel called once. You can always try both and compare the results. Also, one big kernel will be beneficial as it may allow you to use shared memory (the fast cache in CUDA) across your entire algorithm if you need. They may be provide you with a significant boost than relying on calling the main card memory with each kernel start. – Bichoy May 27 '13 at 22:10
    
Thanks. I had to go with the multiple kernel route because I realized that with the big kernel I needed LOTS of memory and I don't think most cuda devices could handle it... – Atirag May 29 '13 at 17:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.