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I have a few objects throughout the program that are facing a similar issue. One example:

I have an Image class:

class Image
{
public:
    Image();
    Image(const Image& copy);
    ~Image();

    void loadimage(string filename);
    void saveimage(string filename);
    Image superimpose(const Image& ontop, Color mask);

    int getwidth();
    int getheight();
    Image operator=(const Image&);

protected:    
    Color** pixels;
    int width;
    int height;
    ImageLoader* loader;
};

It has a copy constructor:

Image::Image(const Image& copy)
{
    width = copy.width;
    height = copy.height;
    loader = copy.loader;

    pixels = new Color*[height];
    for(int i = 0; i < height; i++)
    {
        pixels[i] = new Color[width];
    }

    for(int h = 0; h < height; h++)
    {
        for(int w = 0; w < width; w++)
        {
            pixels[h][w] = copy.pixels[h][w];
        }
    }
}

Color is a struct:

struct Color
{
    unsigned int r;
    unsigned int g;
    unsigned int b;
};

My concern is that I create a dynamic two-dimensional array of Color structs, but I'm not sure when and where to delete it. I implemented the following in my Image destructor, but I'm not 100% certain that it's doing the job and I'm not sure how to check if it does:

Image::~Image()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < height; i++)
    {
        delete[] pixels[i];
    }

    delete[] pixels;
    pixels = NULL;
}

Am I implementing the memory deallocation correctly?

share|improve this question
    
The most correct way would be to not implement it at all and use something that will do manage the memory for you. Also, setting something that's about to be destroyed to NULL is pretty pointless. –  chris May 25 '13 at 23:10
    
@chris So.... what would I use? You didn't mention. –  B.K. May 26 '13 at 0:11
2  
I generally prefer a Matrix class that encapsulates a 1D std::vector. –  chris May 26 '13 at 0:18
    
@chris Thanks you. –  B.K. May 26 '13 at 0:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's OK.

Two points, you can use unique_ptr or shared_ptr and get rid of self deleting the memory.

Second is, I prefer use nullptr or 0 instead of NULL (although it's standard). Moreover, since the container object is destroying, you don't need to set its member to null.

And the best is using std::vector:

std::vector<std::vector<Color>> pixels;

...

Image::Image(const Image& copy)
{
    width = copy.width;
    height = copy.height;
    loader = copy.loader;

    pixels.resize(height);
    for (int i = 0; i < height; i++)
    {
        pixels[i].resize(width);
    }

    for(int h = 0; h < height; h++)
    {
        for(int w = 0; w < width; w++)
        {
            pixels[h][w] = copy.pixels[h][w];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for unique_ptr, which is more efficient than vector here. But shared_ptr doesn't support arrays. –  Potatoswatter May 25 '13 at 23:45
    
How would you implement unique_ptr in this scenario? I've read up on them, but I'm a bit confused. –  B.K. May 26 '13 at 0:18

Am I implementing the memory deallocation correctly?

Yes. It is correct. However, you'd better replace the 2D dynamic array with vector of vectors, which manages memory by itself, safer and less error prone.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I might have to do that if I can't figure out the unqiue_ptr that was suggested by M M. –  B.K. May 26 '13 at 0:27
    
@Noobacode You are welcome. You may find a lot of posts about unique_ptr on SO. –  taocp May 26 '13 at 0:29

I see a lack of RAII here and problems with potential exceptions thrown like bad_alloc which will leave your object in an undefined state. I would allocate the memomry in an object that manages memory for you and so when the object is out of scope it will destroy itself. Said object should also provide a copy construtor that deep copies memory and allows you to access the raw data through a pointer to the first byte. std::vector has all these attributes.

share|improve this answer
    
Never heard of RAII before you mentioned it, thank you. It's a good read. –  B.K. May 26 '13 at 0:29

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