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I have recently started looking into querying large sets of csv data lying on hdfs using hive and impala. As i was expecting, I get better response time with impala compared to hive for the queries i have used so far. I am wondering if there are some types of queries/use cases that still need hive and where impala is not a good fit.

How does impala provide faster query response compared to hive for the same data on hdfs?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 43 down vote accepted

You should see Impala as "SQL on HDFS", while Hive is more "SQL on Hadoop".

In other words, Impala doesn't even use Hadoop at all. It simply has daemons running on all your nodes which cache some of the data that is in HDFS, so that these daemons can return data quickly without having to go through a whole Map/Reduce job.

The reason for this is that there is a certain overhead involved in running a Map/Reduce job, so by short-circuiting Map/Reduce altogether you can get some pretty big gain in runtime.

That being said, Impala does not replace Hive, it is good for very different use cases. Impala doesn't provide fault-tolerance compared to Hive, so if there is a problem during your query then it's gone. Definitely for ETL type of jobs where failure of one job would be costly I would recommend Hive, but Impala can be awesome for small ad-hoc queries, for example for data scientists or business analysts who just want to take a look and analyze some data without building robust jobs. Also from my personal experience, Impala is still not very mature, and I've seen some crashes sometimes when the amount of data is larger than available memory.

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Thanks Charles for this explanation. "Impala doesn't provide fault-tolerance compared to Hive", does it mean if a node goes while the query is processing then it fails. Did you have some other scenario(s) in mind. –  techuser May 28 '13 at 13:51
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@Integrator From an interview in May 2013, one of the product managers at Cloudera confirmed that in its current implementation, if a node fails mid-query, that query would get aborted, and the user would need to reissue that query (datanami.com/datanami/2013-05-01/…) –  Charles Menguy May 28 '13 at 15:03
    
Thank you for the answer. –  techuser Jun 1 '13 at 17:57
    
@CharlesMenguy, i have a question here. 1.) When you referred "It simply has daemons running on all your nodes which cache some of the data that is in HDFS" When the actual cache Happens? Is that when the data actually gets loaded to HDFS? or Impala has its own Configuration that Cache now and then. 2.) And when you mention that "Some of the Data". Does it means that it Cache only Part of the data Set in a Table? if that is the case will it miss remaining records. –  Ragav May 23 at 17:48

IMHO, SQL on HDFS and SQL on Hadoop are the same. After all Hadoop is HDFS+MapReduce. So when we say SQL on HDFS, it is understood that it is SQL on Hadoop.

Coming back to the actual question, Impala provides faster response as it uses MPP(massively parallel processing) unlike Hive which uses MapReduce under the hood, which involves some initial overheads (as Charles sir has specified). Massively parallel processing is a type of computing that uses many separate CPUs running in parallel to execute a single program where each CPU has it's own dedicated memory. The very fact that Impala, being MPP based, doesn't involve the overheads of a MapReduce jobs viz. job setup and creation,slot assignment, split creation, map generation etc, which makes it blazingly fast.

But that doesn't mean that Impala is the solution to all your problems. Being highly memory intensive(MPP), it is not a good fit for tasks that require heavy data operations like joins etc, as you just can't fit everything into the meory. This is where Hive is a better fit.

So, if you need real time, ad-hoc queries over a subset of your data go for Impala. And if you have batch processing kinda needs over your BigData go for Hive.

HTH

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may i have the reason for downvote??? –  Tariq May 27 '13 at 8:19
    
Thank you for the answer. –  techuser Jun 1 '13 at 17:58
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"SQL on HDFS and SQL on Hadoop are the same": well, not really, since (as you say) "SQL on hadoop" = "SQL on hdfs using m/r" i.e. "SQL on hdfs" bypasses m/r completely. –  davek Sep 16 '13 at 10:18
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Impala, Presto, and the other fast new query engines use data in HDFS, but are not based on MapReduce. They sidestep it completely. –  btubbs Jan 24 at 15:36
    
I never said that impala is SQL on HDFS using MR. It is clearly specified in my answer that it uses MPP. –  Tariq Feb 27 at 5:41

There are some key features in impala that makes its fast.

  1. It does not use map/reduce which are very expensive to fork in separate jvms. It runs separate Impala Daemon which splits the query and runs them in parallel and merge result set at the end.

  2. It does most of its operation in-memory.

  3. It uses hdfs for its storage which is fast for large files. It caches as much as possible from queries to results to data.

  4. It supports new file format like parquet, which is columnar file format. So if you use this format it will be faster for queries where you are accessing only few columns most of the time.

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But how would parquet file format helps in querying RDBMS queries... I'm exploring Impala, so just curios. Do share if you have any clear documentation. Thanks –  Raja Reddy Dec 21 '13 at 4:30
    
parquet is columnar storage and using parquet you get all those advantages you can get in columnar database. Its alot faster when you are using few columns than all of them in tables in most of your queries. –  Animesh Raj Jha Dec 23 '13 at 18:52

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