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How can I know if a device is supported on a running linux and if so, which device driver controls it?
For instance, lspci on a server(PowerEdge 2900) gives:

00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000X Chipset Memory Controller Hub (rev 12)
00:02.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset PCI Express x4 Port 2 (rev 12)
00:03.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset PCI Express x4 Port 3 (rev 12)
00:04.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset PCI Express x4 Port 4 (rev 12)
00:05.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset PCI Express x4 Port 5 (rev 12)
00:06.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset PCI Express x8 Port 6-7 (rev 12)
00:07.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset PCI Express x4 Port 7 (rev 12)
00:08.0 System peripheral: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset DMA Engine (rev 12)
00:10.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset FSB Registers (rev 12)
00:10.1 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset FSB Registers (rev 12)
00:10.2 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset FSB Registers (rev 12)
00:11.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset Reserved Registers (rev 12)
00:13.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset Reserved Registers (rev 12)
00:15.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset FBD Registers (rev 12)
00:16.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 5000 Series Chipset FBD Registers (rev 12)
00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset PCI Express Root Port 1 (rev 09)
00:1d.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset UHCI USB Controller #1 (rev 09)
00:1d.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset UHCI USB Controller #2 (rev 09)
00:1d.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset UHCI USB Controller #3 (rev 09)
00:1d.3 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset UHCI USB Controller #4 (rev 09)
00:1d.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset EHCI USB2 Controller (rev 09)
00:1e.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 PCI Bridge (rev d9)
00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset LPC Interface Controller (rev 09)
00:1f.1 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB IDE Controller (rev 09)
00:1f.2 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 631xESB/632xESB/3100 Chipset SATA IDE Controller (rev 09)
01:00.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 80333 Segment-A PCI Express-to-PCI Express Bridge
01:00.2 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 80333 Segment-B PCI Express-to-PCI Express Bridge
02:0e.0 RAID bus controller: Dell PowerEdge Expandable RAID controller 5
04:00.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom EPB PCI-Express to PCI-X Bridge (rev c3)
05:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme II BCM5708 Gigabit Ethernet (rev 12)
06:00.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 6311ESB/6321ESB PCI Express Upstream Port (rev 01)
06:00.3 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 6311ESB/6321ESB PCI Express to PCI-X Bridge (rev 01)
07:00.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 6311ESB/6321ESB PCI Express Downstream Port E1 (rev 01)
07:01.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 6311ESB/6321ESB PCI Express Downstream Port E2 (rev 01)
08:00.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom EPB PCI-Express to PCI-X Bridge (rev c3)
09:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme II BCM5708 Gigabit Ethernet (rev 12)
0b:02.0 Multimedia audio controller: Creative Labs SB Audigy (rev 03)
0b:02.1 Input device controller: Creative Labs SB Audigy Game Port (rev 03)
0b:02.2 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Creative Labs SB Audigy FireWire Port
10:0d.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc ES1000 (rev 02)

how can I find:
1 * which device driver(kernel module) controls each device?
2 * which device is controled by a device driver compiled in the kernel (and not as a module)
3 * which device doesn't have a device driver (compiled in or as a module)?

this script (adapted from another in "Linux Kernel in a Nutshell") partially resolves #1:
---------------
#!/bin/bash
for i in $(find /sys/ -name modalias); do
echo "----------------------------------"
modalias=$(cat $i)
echo "$(dirname $i) --> $modalias"
/sbin/modprobe --config /dev/null --show-depends $(cat $i) 2>&1
done
---------------

but there are some problems with it:
1. don't know of an automated way to convert
/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1e.0/0000:10:0d.0 --> pci:v00001002d0000515Esv00001028sd000001B1bc03sc00i00
to
10:0d.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc ES1000 (rev 02)

2. In some cases the devices are internal to the MB and I don't even know a way to find the real name of the device. For example:
/sys/devices/platform/dcdbas --> platform:dcdbas
/sys/devices/platform/iTCO_wdt --> platform:iTCO_wdt
/sys/devices/LNXSYSTM:00 --> acpi:LNXSYSTM:
/sys/devices/LNXSYSTM:00/device:00/PNP0C33:00 --> acpi:PNP0C33:PNP0C01:
/sys/devices/LNXSYSTM:00/device:00/PNP0A08:00 --> acpi:PNP0A08:PNP0A03:
/sys/devices/LNXSYSTM:00/device:00/PNP0A08:00/device:0d/PNP0200:00 --> acpi:PNP0200:
and many others

3. When the device driver is compiled in (or doesn't exist) the response is
FATAL: Module XXXX not found.
Indicating there is no module for the device.

In some cases the driver is compiled in (e.g.)
---------------
/sys/devices/platform/serial8250 --> platform:serial8250
FATAL: Module platform:serial8250 not found.
----------------------------------
/sys/devices/platform/i8042 --> platform:i8042
FATAL: Module platform:i8042 not found.
---------------

in other cases, the driver just doesn't exist. But I don't know a way to tell the difference.

Does anyone knows? (sorry for the reedit)

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5 Answers 5

Try HAL device manager, which is also available as "KDE HAL device manager" and "gnome-device-manager". Basically, these are frontends to the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL), which reads /sysfs/ et al.

It gives information like "info.linux.driver", see the screenshot below:

I'm sorry I don't know how to fiddle out this information yourself in sysfs, but it must be somewhere if HAL is able to find it :-)

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Well this is a little late, and maybe at that time (2008) didn't even exists, but lspci -n or better lspci -k should fix the problem; for instance:

04:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4312 802.11b/g (rev 01)

    Kernel driver in use: wl
    Kernel modules: wl, ssb
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The following script will tell you which dynamically loaded drivers are running, although I would also like an automated way of figuring out which compiled in modules are actually in use also so I could de-bloat my kernel some more.

#!/bin/bash
/sbin/lsmod | tail -n+2 | cut -d" " -f1 | xargs /sbin/modinfo -n | sort ;

I'm not sure how relevent the rest of this is to your question but thought you or others might find it useful.

The following code will figure out which .config options control each of the dynamically loaded kernel modules, although I haven't figured out a way to do the same for dynamic modules in the ubuntu lum package yet ( this script is still a work in progress ):

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use Getopt::Long;

my ($kernConfigIn, $kernConfigOut, $kernSourceDir, $lumSourceDir, $lumConfigIn, $lumConfigOut, $help);

GetOptions(
    'ksd=s'   => \$kernSourceDir,
    'lsd=s'    => \$lumSourceDir,
    'kci=s'      => \$kernConfigIn,
    'lci=s'       => \$lumConfigIn,
    'kco=s'      => \$kernConfigOut,
    'lco=s'       => \$lumConfigOut,
    'help' => \$help);

if ($help || !$kernSourceDir || !$lumSourceDir ) { Usage($0); }

sub Usage {  print "usage error\n"; exit; };

my @modules = `/sbin/lsmod | tail -n+2 | cut -d" " -f1 | xargs /sbin/modinfo -n | sort ;`;
my @kconfig;

foreach my $module (@modules) {
    my ($package, $path, $modName) = ( $module =~ m/\/((?:kernel)|(?:ubuntu))\/(.*)\/(.*)\.ko/) ;
    $package eq 'kernel' ? push @kconfig, kernel($package, $path, $modName) : ubuntu($package, $path, $modName); 
}

# kernel package
sub kernel {
    my ($package, $path, $modName) = @_;
    my $makefile = $kernSourceDir.$path."/Makefile"; 
#    print "$package, $path, $modName\n";
#    print "$makefile\n";
    my $option;
    chomp($option = `cat $makefile | sed -n "s/^obj-\\\$(CONFIG_\\([A-Z0-9_]*\\))\\W*+=.*"$modName"\\.o.*/CONFIG_\\1/p"`);
    print "$option\n";
    return $option;
}

# deal with lum configs
sub ubuntu {

}

There is a script by Andreas Goelzer which with slight modification will turn off all unused kernel modules in your .config which significantly speeds up your compiles.

You can find it here:

http://andreas.goelzer.de/kernel-config-based-on-lsmod-output

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lspci -n will give you PCI ids that you can search for on the linux kernel driver database. This will tell you which kernel options to enable.

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I don't think you can get a 100% clear-cut answer that you can get in Windows device manager.

  • A device may be controlled by several kernel modules (say nvidia + agpgart).
  • A kernel module may control more than one device (usbhid).
  • You can also have many-to-many relationship (usbcore + usbhid).
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