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I have a very large (read only) array of data that I want to be processed by multiple processes in parallel.

I like the Pool.map function and would like to use it to calculate functions on that data in parallel.

I saw that one can use the Value or Array class to use shared memory data between processes. But when I try to use this I get a RuntimeError: 'SynchronizedString objects should only be shared between processes through inheritance when using the Pool.map function:

Here is a simplified example of what I am trying to do:

from sys import stdin
from multiprocessing import Pool, Array

def count_it( arr, key ):
  count = 0
  for c in arr:
    if c == key:
      count += 1
  return count

if __name__ == '__main__':
  testData = "abcabcs bsdfsdf gdfg dffdgdfg sdfsdfsd sdfdsfsdf"
  # want to share it using shared memory
  toShare = Array('c', testData)

  # this works
  print count_it( toShare, "a" )

  pool = Pool()

  # RuntimeError here
  print pool.map( count_it, [(toShare,key) for key in ["a", "b", "s", "d"]] )

Can anyone tell me what I am doing wrong here?

So what i would like to do is pass info about a newly created shared memory allocated array to the processes after they have been created in the process pool.

share|improve this question
    
Unfortunately that's not possible. The recommended way according to mp documentation is to use inheritence (on fork platforms). For read only data as you have here one would normally use a global, but can used a shared Array for read/write communication. Forking is cheap so you can recreate the Pool whenever you receive the data, then close it afterwards. Unfortunately, on Windows this isn't possible - the workaround is to use a shared memory Array (even in the read only case) but this can only be passed to subprocesses at process creation (I imagine they need to be added to the access list... –  robince Nov 13 '09 at 10:24
    
for the shared memory segment and that this logic isn't implemented except at subprocess startup). You can pass the shared data array at Pool start up as I showed, or to a Process in a similar way. You can't pass a shared memory Array to an open Pool - you have to create the Pool after the memory. Easy ways around this include allocating a maximum size buffer, or just allocating the array when you know the required size before starting the Pool. If you keep your global variables down Pool shouldn't be too expensive on windows either - global variables are automatically ... –  robince Nov 13 '09 at 10:27
    
pickled and sent to the subprocesses - which is why I my suggestion to make one buffer of sufficient size at the start (where hopefully your amount of global variables is small), then Pool, is better. I took the time to understand and solve your problem in good faith - before you edited your question - so while I understand if you want to let it run, I hope at the end you will consider accepting my answer if nothing substantially different/better comes along. –  robince Nov 13 '09 at 10:30
    
I had a closer look at the source code and the information about the shared memory can be pickled (needed to get info about it over to the client process on windows) but that code has an assert to only run during process spawning. I wonder why that is. –  Jeroen Dirks Nov 13 '09 at 15:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted
+250

Trying again as I just saw the bounty ;)

Basically I think the error message means what it said - multiprocessing shared memory Arrays can't be passed as arguments (by pickling). It doesn't make sense to serialise the data - the point is the data is shared memory. So you have to make the shared array global. I think it's neater to put it as the attribute of a module, as in my first answer, but just leaving it as a global variable in your example also works well. Taking on board your point of not wanting to set the data before the fork, here is a modified example. If you wanted to have more than one possible shared array (and that's why you wanted to pass toShare as an argument) you could similarly make a global list of shared arrays, and just pass the index to count_it (which would become for c in toShare[i]:).

from sys import stdin
from multiprocessing import Pool, Array, Process

def count_it( key ):
  count = 0
  for c in toShare:
    if c == key:
      count += 1
  return count

if __name__ == '__main__':
  # allocate shared array - want lock=False in this case since we 
  # aren't writing to it and want to allow multiple processes to access
  # at the same time - I think with lock=True there would be little or 
  # no speedup
  maxLength = 50
  toShare = Array('c', maxLength, lock=False)

  # fork
  pool = Pool()

  # can set data after fork
  testData = "abcabcs bsdfsdf gdfg dffdgdfg sdfsdfsd sdfdsfsdf"
  if len(testData) > maxLength:
      raise ValueError, "Shared array too small to hold data"
  toShare[:len(testData)] = testData

  print pool.map( count_it, ["a", "b", "s", "d"] )

[EDIT: The above doesn't work on windows because of not using fork. However, the below does work on Windows, still using Pool, so I think this is the closest to what you want:

from sys import stdin
from multiprocessing import Pool, Array, Process
import mymodule

def count_it( key ):
  count = 0
  for c in mymodule.toShare:
    if c == key:
      count += 1
  return count

def initProcess(share):
  mymodule.toShare = share

if __name__ == '__main__':
  # allocate shared array - want lock=False in this case since we 
  # aren't writing to it and want to allow multiple processes to access
  # at the same time - I think with lock=True there would be little or 
  # no speedup
  maxLength = 50
  toShare = Array('c', maxLength, lock=False)

  # fork
  pool = Pool(initializer=initProcess,initargs=(toShare,))

  # can set data after fork
  testData = "abcabcs bsdfsdf gdfg dffdgdfg sdfsdfsd sdfdsfsdf"
  if len(testData) > maxLength:
      raise ValueError, "Shared array too small to hold data"
  toShare[:len(testData)] = testData

  print pool.map( count_it, ["a", "b", "s", "d"] )

Not sure why map won't Pickle the array but Process and Pool will - I think perhaps it has be transferred at the point of the subprocess initialization on windows. Note that the data is still set after the fork though.

share|improve this answer
    
Even on platforms with fork you can not insert new shared data into toShare after the fork since each process will have its own independent copy at that point. –  Jeroen Dirks Nov 12 '09 at 14:10
    
So the real problem seems to be that how we can pickle the information about an Array so it can be send and connected to from the other process. –  Jeroen Dirks Nov 12 '09 at 14:41
    
@James - no that's not right. The array has to be set up before the fork, but then it is shared memory that can be changed, with changes visible across all children. Look at the example - I put the data into the array after the fork (which occure when Pool() is instantiated). That data could be obtained at run time, after the fork, and as long as it fits into the preallocated shared memory segment it can be copied there and seen from all children. –  robince Nov 12 '09 at 15:49
    
You can pickle the Array, but not using Pool. –  jwilson Nov 12 '09 at 16:21
    
Editted to add working Windows version, using only Pool (by passing the shared array as an initiliazation parameter. –  robince Nov 12 '09 at 16:26

The problem I see is that Pool doesn't support pickling shared data through its argument list. That's what the error message means by "objects should only be shared between processes through inheritance". The shared data needs to be inherited, i.e., global if you want to share it using the Pool class.

If you need to pass them explicitly, you may have to use multiprocessing.Process. Here is your reworked example:

from multiprocessing import Process, Array, Queue

def count_it( q, arr, key ):
  count = 0
  for c in arr:
    if c == key:
      count += 1
  q.put((key, count))

if __name__ == '__main__':
  testData = "abcabcs bsdfsdf gdfg dffdgdfg sdfsdfsd sdfdsfsdf"
  # want to share it using shared memory
  toShare = Array('c', testData)

  q = Queue()
  keys = ['a', 'b', 's', 'd']
  workers = [Process(target=count_it, args = (q, toShare, key))
    for key in keys]

  for p in workers:
    p.start()
  for p in workers:
    p.join()
  while not q.empty():
    print q.get(),

Output: ('s', 9) ('a', 2) ('b', 3) ('d', 12)

The ordering of elements of the queue may vary.

To make this more generic and similar to Pool, you could create a fixed N number of Processes, split the list of keys into N pieces, and then use a wrapper function as the Process target, which will call count_it for each key in the list it is passed, like:

def wrapper( q, arr, keys ):
  for k in keys:
    count_it(q, arr, k)
share|improve this answer

If the data is read only just make it a variable in a module before the fork from Pool. Then all the child processes should be able to access it, and it won't be copied provided you don't write to it.

import myglobals # anything (empty .py file)
myglobals.data = []

def count_it( key ):
    count = 0
    for c in myglobals.data:
        if c == key:
            count += 1
    return count

if __name__ == '__main__':
myglobals.data = "abcabcs bsdfsdf gdfg dffdgdfg sdfsdfsd sdfdsfsdf"

pool = Pool()
print pool.map( count_it, ["a", "b", "s", "d"] )

If you do want to try to use Array though you could try with the lock=False keyword argument (it is true by default).

share|improve this answer
    
I do not believe the use of globals is safe and would certainly not work on windows where the processes are not forked. –  Jeroen Dirks Nov 4 '09 at 20:41
    
How is it not safe? If you only need read access to the data it is fine. If you write to it by mistake, then the modified page will be copied-on-write for the child process so nothing bad will happen (wouldn't interfere with other processes for example). You're right it won't work on windows though... –  robince Nov 4 '09 at 20:59
    
You are right that it is safe on fork based platforms. But I would like to know if there is a shared memory based way to share large amounts of data after the process pool is created. –  Jeroen Dirks Nov 4 '09 at 21:00

The multiprocessing.sharedctypes module provides functions for allocating ctypes objects from shared memory which can be inherited by child processes.

So your usage of sharedctypes is wrong. Do you wish to inherit this array from parent process or you prefer to pass it explicitly? In the former case you have to create a global variable as other answers suggest. But you don't need to use sharedctypes to pass it explicitly, just pass original testData.

BTW, your usage of Pool.map() is wrong. It has the same interface as builtin map() function (did you messed it with starmap()?). Below is working example with, passing array explicitly:

from multiprocessing import Pool

def count_it( (arr, key) ):
    count = 0
    for c in arr:
        if c == key:
            count += 1
    return count

if __name__ == '__main__':
    testData = "abcabcs bsdfsdf gdfg dffdgdfg sdfsdfsd sdfdsfsdf"
    pool = Pool()
    print pool.map(count_it, [(testData, key) for key in ["a", "b", "s", "d"]])
share|improve this answer
    
That's not what he wants because in theory testData will be very big - and this method results it in being pickled (requiring extra memory) and copied to each process (requiring at least n x original storage). –  robince Nov 12 '09 at 16:30
    
@thrope: you are right, that's why I mentioned both possible ways. Example for using global variable should be obvious, so there is not need to list it. –  Denis Otkidach Nov 12 '09 at 18:44
1  
@Denis - yep, but unfortunately the global method doesn't work on Windows - it relies on fork and unix copy-on-write. If he uses the global method on windows multiprocessing will pickle the data and send it to each child subprocess - again requiring much more memory. –  robince Nov 12 '09 at 23:11

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