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Can someone explain this code? I got it from the solutions part of an exercise so it does run. Why isn't sorted compared using ==, and why does sorted = false need to add sorted after until?

def bubble_sort(arr)
  sorted = false
  until sorted
    sorted = true
    (arr.count - 1).times do |i|
      if arr[i] > arr[i + 1]
        arr[i], arr[i + 1] = arr[i + 1], arr[i]
        sorted = false
      end
    end
  end

  arr
end

I would have expected the code to be like this:

sorted = false
until sorted == true do

However, when I tried to replace it with this, I get the following error:

eval):12: (eval):12: compile error (SyntaxError)
(eval):3: syntax error, unexpected kDO_COND, expecting kEND
    (arr.count - 1).times do |i|
                        ^
(eval):12: syntax error, unexpected kEND, expecting $end

This is the full code that's getting the error:

def bubble_sort(arr)
  sorted = false
  until sorted == true
    (arr.count - 1).times do |i|
      if arr[i] > arr[i + 1]
        arr[i], arr[i + 1] = arr[i + 1], arr[i]
        sorted = false
      end
    end
  end

  arr
end
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1  
until sorted sorted == true? This doesn't make any sense. Also, your implementation is now invalid. Please, get a good book on ruby. –  Sergio Tulentsev May 26 '13 at 12:53
    
sorry I made a typo which has now been edited, its just that this bubble sort problem has been making me confused for a while and this book is indeed confusing. Code still doesn't work with the code edited –  JaTo May 26 '13 at 12:59
    
You left out the line which sets sorted = true this time. Now sorted will never be true. –  steenslag May 26 '13 at 13:01
    
I need a sorted = true line under the "until sorted == true" line? Doesn't that sort of end the loop right there? –  JaTo May 26 '13 at 13:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe you are mostly confusing the algorithm with Ruby syntax.

As for as the algorithm, you are not allowed to remove sorted = true, the line after until, because your loop would never end because sorted never becomes true.

About Ruby syntax, what you wrote is correct, you can write the longer form of until sorted, which is until sorted == true. Your problem is removing sorted = true which assigns true to sorted, unless it gets false again in the if condition.

share|improve this answer
    
Yea that is the problem. I am new to programming. Thanks to you and everyone else who helped. –  JaTo May 26 '13 at 13:22

Don't confuse = and ==. One is assignment operator and the other is comparison operator.

sorted = false # sets initial value for a flag
until sorted # check if the flag is true at beginning of iteration
  # code that can change `sorted`
end

Update

These two forms are equivalent in this case. There's no difference. Both work.

until sorted
until sorted == true
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Sergio, the code above is the solution from the exercise? I agree with what you are saying and I see it the same way? Any idea why the solution would use that coding? Plus I ran the coding changing it to sorted = false and until sorted but it wouldnt run. –  JaTo May 26 '13 at 12:37
    
@JamieS: I'm not sure what you mean. The code in your question is a valid implementation of bubble sort. It works. –  Sergio Tulentsev May 26 '13 at 12:39
    
I dont understand why there is that extra "sorted" right after "until" –  JaTo May 26 '13 at 12:40
    
@JamieS: it's the syntax. It means, "until this expression (sorted) holds a truthy value" –  Sergio Tulentsev May 26 '13 at 12:41
    
I have looked at ruby documentation, it doesn't really explain this. i thought it was just Until x>y do ..... why do we have to mention "sorted" again in this case? Why can't just do until sorted == false ? –  JaTo May 26 '13 at 12:44

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