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How can I know if a file is a binary file?

For example, compiled c file.

I want to read all files from some directory, but I want ignore binary files.

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Ultimately all files are binary. Text files just happen to contain binary representations of human-readable character data. No method for distinguishing text from non-text can be 100% reliable. –  Keith Thompson Jun 18 '13 at 22:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use utility file, sample usage:

 $ file /bin/bash
 /bin/bash: Mach-O universal binary with 2 architectures
 /bin/bash (for architecture x86_64):   Mach-O 64-bit executable x86_64
 /bin/bash (for architecture i386): Mach-O executable i386

 $ file /etc/passwd
 /etc/passwd: ASCII English text

 $ file code.c
 code.c: ASCII c program text

file manual page

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Consider using 'file --mine'. For binary files it reports "... charset=binary", so one can simply grep for the regexp "binary$". –  4dan May 21 at 20:00
    
@4dan - perhaps --mime? :) –  Bach Jun 19 at 8:49

Adapted from excluding binary file

find . -exec file {} \; | grep text | cut -d: -f1
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This should be grep text; historically, file didn't always say ASCII, but rather "shell script text" for example. –  Jens May 26 '13 at 15:32
    
@Jens Thanks for reminding. Just check file manpage, it should be text. –  gongzhitaao May 26 '13 at 15:46
    
I just realized that reinvented the wheel once again: for file in find . -type f -exec file {} \; | grep text | perl -nle 'split /:/;print $_[0]' ; do grep -i --color 'string_to_search' $file ; done ; –  YordanGeorgiev Nov 22 '13 at 7:46
1  
Thanks, used and adjusted it to find all binary files in a folder: find . -type f -exec file {} \; | grep -v text | cut -d: -f1 –  Clerius Nov 5 at 10:04

Use Perl’s built-in -T file test operator, preferably after ascertaining that it is a plain file using the -f file test operator:

$ perl -le 'for (@ARGV) { print if -f && -T }' \
    getwinsz.c a.out /etc/termcap /bin /bin/cat \
    /dev/tty /usr/share/zoneinfo/UTC /etc/motd
getwinsz.c
/etc/termcap
/etc/motd

Here’s the complement of that set:

$ perl -le 'for (@ARGV) { print unless -f && -T }' \
    getwinsz.c a.out /etc/termcap /bin /bin/cat \
    /dev/tty /usr/share/zoneinfo/UTC /etc/motd
a.out
/bin
/bin/cat
/dev/tty
/usr/share/zoneinfo/UTC
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perl -E 'exit((-B $ARGV[0])?0:1);' file-to-test

Could be used to check whenever "file-to-test" is binary. The above command will exit wit code 0 on binary files, otherwise the exit code would be 1.

The reverse check for text file can look like the following command:

perl -E 'exit((-T $ARGV[0])?0:1);' file-to-test

Likewise the above command will exit with status 0 if the "file-to-test" is text (not binary).

Read more about the -B and -T checks using command perldoc -f -X.

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perldoc.perl.org/functions/-X.html –  Onlyjob Sep 9 '13 at 10:36

It's kind of brute force to exclude binary files with tr -d "[[:print:]\n\t]" < file | wc -c, but it is no heuristic guesswork either.

find . -type f -maxdepth 1 -exec /bin/sh -c '
   for file in "$@"; do
      if [ $(LC_ALL=C LANG=C tr -d "[[:print:]\n\t]" < "$file" | wc -c) -gt 0 ]; then
         echo "${file} is no ASCII text file (UNIX)"
      else
         echo "${file} is ASCII text file (UNIX)"
      fi
   done
' _ '{}' +

The following brute-force approach using grep -a -m 1 $'[^[:print:]\t]' file seems quite a bit faster, though.

find . -type f -maxdepth 1 -exec /bin/sh -c '
   tab="$(printf "\t")"
   for file in "$@"; do
      if LC_ALL=C LANG=C grep -a -m 1 "[^[:print:]${tab}]" "$file" 1>/dev/null 2>&1; then
         echo "${file} is no ASCII text file (UNIX)"
      else
         echo "${file} is ASCII text file (UNIX)"
      fi
   done
' _ '{}' + 
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