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I was playing with code to understand internal and external linkage in c++.I came up with the code whose out seems to vary depending on the sequence in which it is linked.


test1.cpp

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
inline int c()
{
     static int p=0;
     p++;
     return p;
}
void a()
{
     cout<<"\nIn function a() , c = "<<c();
}


test2.cpp

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

inline int c()
{
    static int p=12;
    p++;
    return p;
}

void b()
{
       cout<<"\nIn function b() , c = "<<c();
} 


driver.cpp

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

void a();
void b();
int c();

int main()
{
   b();
   a();
   a();
   b();
   cout<<"\nIn function main() = , c "<< c();
   cout<<"\n";
}

output 1 :-

when compiles as follows :- 

bash#>g++ -c test1.cpp
bash#>g++ -c test2.cpp
bash#>g++ -c driver.cpp

bash#>g++ -o out driver.o test1.o test2.o
bash#>./out

In function b() , c = 1
In function a() ,  c = 2
In function a() ,  c = 3
In function b() , c = 4
IN main() , c = 5

In above output , compiler is considering c() defined in test1.cpp

output 2:- changing sequence of test1.o and test2.o while linking.

bash#>g++ -o out driver.o test2.o test1.o

In function b() , c = 13
In function a() ,  c = 14
In function a() ,  c = 15 
In function b() , c = 16
IN main() , c = 17

In above output , compiler is considering c() defined in test2.cpp

I was perplexed when i made minor changes in the code , which are as follows :-
1) if I do not call c() in function a() [test1.cpp] and c() in funciton b()[test2.cpp]

//test1.cpp changes
void a()
{
   cout<<"\nIn function a() , c = "; // not calling c()
}

//test2.cpp changes
void b()
{
    cout<<"\nIn function b() , c = "; // not calling c()
} 

I get following error while linking :-

bash#>g++ -o out driver.o test1.o test2.o
driver.o: In function `main':
driver.cpp:(.text+0x1f): undefined reference to `c()'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

2) If i call c() in any one of the file i.e either in test1.cpp or in test2.cpp , then i wont get linker error.

Could anyone please help me in understanding this behaviour.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
To avoid linker issues, move your inline functions to the header files. –  Thomas Matthews May 26 '13 at 18:09
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your program has undefined behavior because it violates the One Definition Rule. Two different translation units are defining a function with same name and signature, but with different bodies.

Per paragraph 3.2/6 of the C++11 Standard:

[...] Given such an entity named D defined in more than one translation unit, then

— each definition of D shall consist of the same sequence of tokens; and

[...]

Your program is also ill-formed because function c() is declared as inline in test1.cpp and test2.cpp, but not in driver.cpp. Per paragraph 7.1.2/4

[...] If a function with external linkage is declared inline in one translation unit, it shall be declared inline in all translation units in which it appears; no diagnostic is required. [...]

The "no diagnostic is required" bit means that the compiler (or linker) may or may not report an error for a violation of this rule. That means you have to be very careful to break it.

share|improve this answer
1  
And he has an inline function that not in all TUs is declared inline as-well. +1 –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 26 '13 at 15:59
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb: I missed that, thank you for mentioning. I'm going to edit –  Andy Prowl May 26 '13 at 16:00
    
Thank you for the answer.But what is the reason for point(2) in my post. –  user1057741 May 26 '13 at 17:33
    
Thank you for the answer.But what is the reason for point(1) and point(2) in my post. why compiler throws error when i don't call c() in function a() and in function b(). whereas it does not throws error if i call c() in either function a() or in function b() –  user1057741 May 26 '13 at 17:43
    
@user1057741: That's because the program is ill-formed and the compiler/linker is not required to tell you for a violation of this rule. So it may produce an error or not. The conclusion is: "Just don't do that". If a function is declared as inline in one translation unit, it must declare inline in all translation units –  Andy Prowl May 26 '13 at 17:45
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