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I know Scheme a bit (read SICP long ago), wrote this program:

(define (prl k m)
  (define (print-line n)
    (cond ((> n 0) (display n)
                   (print-line (- n 1)))
          (else (newline))))
  (print-line k)
  (cond ((> m 1) (prl (+ k 1) (- m 1)))))

example - http://ideone.com/LuG45W

But i need this in CL, without using any macro. Can you help me with implementation? Thanks.

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The translation from Scheme to CL in this case is pretty straightforward:

(defun prl (k m)
  (labels ((print-line (n)
             (cond ((> n 0)
                    (princ n)
                    (print-line (- n 1)))
                   (t (terpri)))))
    (print-line k)
    (cond ((> m 1)
           (prl (+ k 1) (- m 1))))))

For example:

(prl 3 4)
(terpri)
(prl 1 4)

321
4321
54321
654321

1
21
321
4321
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oh, i see. so awkward. thanks a lot) –  pproger May 26 '13 at 16:33
1  
This is wrong. DEFUN does not define local functions, as does DEFINE in Scheme. –  Rainer Joswig May 26 '13 at 17:07
    
@RainerJoswig what's you suggestion? taking the internal definition outside? –  Óscar López May 26 '13 at 17:14
    
@Óscar López: a local function in Common Lisp is defined by FLET or LABELS. LABELS allows you to define self-recursive functions. –  Rainer Joswig May 26 '13 at 17:16
    
@RainerJoswig thanks, I wasn't aware of this defun behavior in CL. Fixed it. –  Óscar López May 26 '13 at 17:22
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Scheme to Common Lisp.

  • SCHEME:DEFINE on the top-level is CL:DEFUN.
  • SCHEME:DEFINE as a local definition is CL:FLET or CL:LABELS.
  • CL is by default and by standard not tail call optimizing. That means best use a) a TCO supporting implementation and direct the compiler to do so or b) use loops where necessary/possible. Note also that most interpreters will not do TCO in Common Lisp, even though the compiler might support it.

So the code will be:

(defun prl (k m)
  (flet ((print-line (n)
           (loop for i downfrom n downto 1 do (write i))
           (terpri)))
    (loop for i from k
          repeat m
          do (print-line i))))
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1  
Many languages do not tail call optimize and recursion is still though to be useful. Most CL implementation is partially or fully TCO-ed though: 0branch.com/notes/tco-cl.html –  Sylwester May 26 '13 at 22:00
    
@Sylwester: print many lines and we'll get a stack overflow without TCO. 'Many CL implementation are partially or fully TCO-ed' - if you use the compiler and the optimization values are set as such - plus you need to check the various restrictions. If you use an Interpreter or something like ABCL, which runs on the JVM, it won't work. Defensive programming says: avoid TCO. –  Rainer Joswig May 26 '13 at 22:07
    
Yep, You win. But really I did have to get more output than I wanted before I got a stack overflow (Clisp overflows after 7k calls or so) Shame on the pople who don't (compile 'prl) after testing that it works with small values :p –  Sylwester May 27 '13 at 20:04
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As Rainer correctly points out, Óscar's solution is not quite correct, since defun defines a new function in the global environment. This should be a correct translation:

(defun prl (k m)
  (labels ((print-line (n)
             (cond ((> n 0)
                    (princ n)
                    (print-line (1- n)))
                   (t (terpri)))))
    (print-line k))
  (when (> m 1)
    (prl (1+ k) (1- m))))

But note that, unlike Scheme, the CL standard does not guarantee tail-call optimization. You'll have to check your implementation's documentation for that.

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One does not have to have tail-recursion guarantee in a language with GOTO:

(defun prl (k m)                   ; (define (prl k m)
  (prog (n)
    PRL
      (setf n k)                   ;   (print-line k)
    PRINT-LINE                     ;   (define (print-line n)
      (cond ((> n 0) (princ n)     ;     (cond ((> n 0) (display n)
               (decf n)            ;              (print-line (- n 1)))
               (go PRINT-LINE))
            (t (terpri)))          ;           (else (newline))))
      (cond                        ;   (cond 
        ((> m 1)                   ;    ((> m 1) 
         (incf k)                  ;     (prl (+ k 1) (- m 1)))))
         (decf m) (go PRL)))))

Testing:

[19]> (prl 3 4)
321
4321
54321
654321
NIL
[20]> (prl 1 4)
1
21
321
4321
NIL
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Other than resembling Fortran better, how is this version better than Joswig's? –  Sylwester May 27 '13 at 19:37
    
@Sylwester better? Why should it be better? How about just being different? YMMV, but for some, the loop macro may be more arcane than prog with explicit goto's. As you know, a goto is nothing but a function call. or vice versa. :) Is prog not a part of CL spec? Is this code not in more direct correspondence with the original Scheme code? –  Will Ness May 27 '13 at 20:24
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