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What is happening in this code? Is so confusing.

#include <utility>

struct check
{
   template <typename T>
   auto foo() -> decltype(std::declval<T>().value, void())
   {
      static_assert(T{}.value == 10, "Incorrect value");
   }
} var;

int main()
{
   struct apple
   {
      int value{10};
   };

   var.foo<apple>();
}

Specifically the part where it has -> and everything after that.

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2  
The -> is a trailing return type. declval makes an instance of the class. decltype finds the type of a compile-time expression. static_assert is a compile-time assert. Time to piece them together :) –  chris May 26 '13 at 18:18
3  
Vague title is not going to be useful to others with the same question. –  Raymond Chen May 26 '13 at 18:20
1  
@RiaD: While that title edit is more helpful, it's still inaccurate - he's asking about a specific-use, it seems. –  Sion Sheevok May 26 '13 at 18:23
    
Made an edit to the title suggesting "What does -> after a function prototype mean?". –  Sion Sheevok May 26 '13 at 18:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Let's go through bit by bit.

auto foo() -> decltype(std::declval<T>().value, void())

This is a trailing return type. It's allowed to use parameters, but here that isn't necessary. I'd guess it's written like that to be clearer. decltype finds the type of the expression inside, but that expression is not actually evaluated. std::declval is used for creating an instance of the type passed to it. The comma operator is used here to make the overall return type void, since the comma operator evaluates the left side, throws it away, evaluates the right side, and returns that.

The first part creates a sort of SFINAE (though I've never seen it used like this). For example, if you had an overload of foo that did the same with value2 instead of value, there would be no ambiguity of which to call. See here for what I mean. Compare it to this one, which just has a return type of void and causes errors.

static_assert(T{}.value == 10, "Incorrect value");

This line makes sure a value-initialized instance of T has its value member have a value of 10. If it doesn't, a compiler error with that text is generated.

} var;

This is just a global object of that class to use.

struct apple
{
   int value{10};
};

This is a sample class to test it with. It has a value member and that member is 10 in a value-initialized instance (default-initialized as well).

var.foo<apple>();

This just calls the function.

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When I do struct grape {}; var.foo<grape>(); it gives me an error. How can I make it silently fail? –  Me myself and I May 26 '13 at 18:36
    
@MemyselfandI, You need to have a version of foo that works with structures like grape. The thing is that you have to make sure calling it with apple is not ambiguous. I'll try to prepare an example. –  chris May 26 '13 at 18:37
    
@MemyselfandI, With many thanks to Xeo, here you go. That's one where you can implement foo based on whether the type has a value data member or not. –  chris May 26 '13 at 19:09

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