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I am quite new to OOP, but I can see its benefits. I have written a class (structured on an example from zetcode) that makes a window and puts an entry box and a button in it. Also, I have a function that sends an email (my actual sending code comes from the module sendEmail that I made). The code:

import sendEmail
from tkinter import *

class mainWindow(Frame):

    def __init__(self, parent):
        Frame.__init__(self, parent, bg = "#C2C2D6")

        self.parent = parent

        self.initUI()

    def initUI(self):
        self.parent.wm_title("Email")
        self.parent.config(height = 370, width = 670)

        email_entry = Entry(self, exportselection = 0, width = 200).pack()
        send_button = Button(self, text = "Send", command = self.send).pack()

        self.pack()

    def send(self):
        body = email_entry.get()
        sendEmail.sendEmail("jacob.kudria@gmail.com", "anon.vm45@gmail.com", "jacob.kudria", "2good4you!", body)

def main():
    root = Tk()
    main_window = mainWindow(root)
    root.mainloop()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

First of all, this code doesn't work (the sending part), but that's not a surprise, I hope that the answer to this question will fix it. My main question is: how can I make the send function, and therefore the email_entry variable (the end function uses that variable) accessible from the outside? In other words, I want my graphics to be in a class, and the rest not. Basically, I declare the entry box variable in the class, but I want to use it outside of the class for the send function. Subsequently, I want to be able to access the send function from inside of the class for the send button. Does this involve making them global...?

Also, this code is probably by far not the best, I am still not very good with python. I will be improving it as I go along. Any tips on the code, besides my main question?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make email_entry a field of your class.

class mainWindow(Frame):
        # ...

    def initUI(self):
        # ...

        # note self here
        self.email_entry = Entry(self, exportselection = 0, width = 200).pack()
        # ...

    def send(self):
        # note self here
        body = self.email_entry.get()
        # ...

Basically, in your code email_entry is just a local variable of initUI function (method). You want it to be a field of your instance.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by a "field"? And also, that still leaves the send function inside the class. It would be nice to have it outside, as to separate UI and actual actions... Or is that not a good idea..? –  Jacob Kudria May 26 '13 at 20:11
    
@JacobKudria main_window is an instance of your class. The data “attached” to it is called fields. I guess, you'll find it useful to start with some basic article about OOP (almost eny will work). And you'll need to learn about basic things like classes, objects (instances), methods, fields. Those are the most basic things in OOP, ans you'll have to understand them. –  kirelagin May 26 '13 at 20:14
    
Oddly enough I understand all of those things except fields... –  Jacob Kudria May 26 '13 at 20:16
    
@JacobKudria Now to your second question. Think this way: your sending functiond will definitely need to access the text of email_entry. `email_entry_ is “contained” inside your window, so your function to access this data should also be a part of this window. Of course, there are different ways to implement this, but they are slightly more difficult. Start with the basics. –  kirelagin May 26 '13 at 20:16
    
I see. I guess that the sending part is still kind of tied to the UI. I just wanted to have it so that what I see is wrapped in a class, and what it does is separate, maybe even wrapped inside its own class. –  Jacob Kudria May 26 '13 at 20:18

The easiest would probably be to have email_entry be a field in your class. However, you could also return it from your initUI function:

def initUI(self):
    self.parent.wm_title("Email")
    self.parent.config(height = 370, width = 670)

    email_entry = Entry(self, exportselection = 0, width = 200).pack()
    send_button = Button(self, text = "Send", command = self.send).pack()

    self.pack()

    return email_entry
share|improve this answer
    
Where would that return to? If I return it, I could then simply use mainWindow.email_entry? –  Jacob Kudria May 26 '13 at 20:14
    
Oh, right. I didn't see that __init__ is what calls initUI. In that case the only possibility I can see is to move the call to initUI out of the constructor, i.e. main_window.initUI() after constructing it. –  Imre Kerr May 26 '13 at 20:17
    
I guess that's an option. Think of it though, it seems like an extra unneeded step...I'll try making it a field of the class. –  Jacob Kudria May 26 '13 at 20:21

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