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I am breaking my head with how to get rid of semantic duplication(Code that is syntactically the same but does different things).

I can't find anywhere a post or something that mentions a bit how to refactor this kind of duplication. All I found was this: http://blogs.agilefaqs.com/tag/code-smells/ but it does not go into detail on how to refactor it.

This is the code that is causing me problem:

public class TeamValidator {       

      public boolean isThereALeader(List<Member> team) {  
           Iterator<Member> iterator = team.iterator();
           while(iterator.hasNext()) {
              Member member = iterator.next();
              String role = member.getRole();
              if(role.equals("Leader"))
                return true;
           }  
           return false;
      }  

      public boolean areThereAtLeast2NewJoiners(List<Member> team) { 
            int amountOfNewJoiners = 0; 
            for(Member member:team) {
                if(amountOfNewJoiners == 2)
                    return true;
                DateTime aMonthAgo = DateTime.now().minusMonths(1);
                if(member.startingDate().isAfter(aMonthAgo)) {
                   amountOfNewJoiners++;
                }
            }
            return false;   
      }
}

In this 2 methods there is semantical duplication, because both Iterate a list and also check some condition/s. Any idea how could I make this semantic duplication disappear? I would really appreciate some tip or suggestion on how to refactor this.

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closed as off topic by T.J. Crowder, Andrew Barber May 27 '13 at 7:22

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3  
You should post this on CodeReview –  mwerschy May 26 '13 at 21:01
1  
Well for a start, choose a style: Use the enhanced for loop, or use explicit iterators. Don't use one in one place and another in another. Other than that, I'm not seeing enough similar in the loops to justify spending any time on it as opposed to, say, actually getting something else done. :-) –  T.J. Crowder May 26 '13 at 21:02
2  
I fail to see any problem with this code (except why use an iterator in the first method instead of a foreach loop). –  fge May 26 '13 at 21:02
1  
There's also a logic flaw in areThereAtLeast2NewJoiners (you can end up with false negatives). –  T.J. Crowder May 26 '13 at 21:07
1  
Actually the second method is broken. It will return false if there are exactly two joiners and the second one is the last in the team. (EDIT: I was writing this when T.J. Crowder commented - I assume the flaw he spotted was the same one I did.) –  Jon Skeet May 26 '13 at 21:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well for a start, choose a style: Use the enhanced for loop, or use explicit iterators. Don't use one in one place and another in another. Other than that, I'm not seeing enough similar in the loops to justify spending any time on it as opposed to, say, actually getting something else done. :-)

But if you really, really want to, you can create an interface that evaluates loop conditions, implement concrete classes for the two situations, and use them. I don't think it buys you much.

(This also fixes the false negative on the new joiners thing.)

Definition:

abstract class LoopEvaluator<T> {
    public boolean eval(List<T> list) {
        for (T element : list) {
            if (this.evalElement(element)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
    abstract boolean evalElement(T element);
}

class LookForLeaders<T extends Member> extends LoopEvaluator<T> {
    @override
    public bool evalElement(T element) {
        return element.getRole().equals("Leader");
    }
}

class LookForTwoNewJoiners extends LoopEvaluator<T> {
    private int newJoiners;

    @override
    public boolean eval(List<T> list) {

        this.newJoiners = 0;

        return super.eval(list);
    }

    @override
    public boolean evalElement(T element) {
        DateTime aMonthAgo = DateTime.now().minusMonths(1);
        if(member.startingDate().isAfter(aMonthAgo)) {
           this.newJoiners++;
        }
        return newJoiners == 2;
    }
}

Use:

public class TeamValidator {       

    @override
    public boolean isThereALeader(List<Member> team) {  
        return new LookForLeader().eval(team);
    }  

    @override
    public boolean areThereAtLeast2NewJoiners(List<Member> team) { 
        return new LookForTwoNewJoiners().eval(team);
    }
}

It's late and I haven't double-checked the syntax, but you get the idea...

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At the end I decided to use this technique. I think is the more flexible of all of the suggested ones. Thank you very much, I think this will very useful in the future. –  sfrj May 27 '13 at 20:25
    
@sfrj: You're welcome! Glad that was useful. –  T.J. Crowder May 27 '13 at 20:36

I don't necessarily think your example warrants using some complex logic or design pattern. But for the sake of argument let's assume you have multiple steps where in each step you validate some condition on the same input and you have an arbitrary number of such validations with a meaning for the order.

You can build a Validator chain.

Define an interface for validating all teams:

public interface TeamValidator {
    boolean validate(List<Member> members);
}

Next define an instance of the API (interface) for each type of validation logic:

public class TeamLeaderValidator implements TeamValidator {
    public boolean validate(List<Member> members) {
        // same code as the isThereALeader method
        ...
    }
}

public class NewJoinerValidator {
    boolean validate(List<Member> members) {
        // same code as the areThereAtLeast2NewJoiners method
        ...
    }
}

Next in your code just call all the validators in order:

public boolean validateMyTeam(List<Member> members) {
    List<TeamValidator> validators = new ArrayList<>();
    validators.add(new TeamLeaderValidator());
    validators.add(new TeamLeaderValidator());

    boolean isValid = true;
    for (TeamValidator validator : validators) {
        isValid &= validator.validate(members);
    }

    return isValid;
}

Please excuse any compilation errors.

Another option is to stop execution when anything evaluates to false or to have each validator call the next validator in line (a la filters).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. The use of the interface is a great idea. +1 –  sfrj May 27 '13 at 20:26

Really, this code just needs to be cleaned up; it's not worth creating a fancy Strategy pattern for this case. Really the only commonality is iterating over a list, and that is what the for loop is for.

public class TeamValidator {       

      public boolean isThereALeader(List<Member> team) {  
           for(Member member:team) {
              if(member.getRole().equals("Leader"))
                return true;
           }  
           return false;
      }  

      public boolean areThereAtLeast2NewJoiners(List<Member> team) { 
            int amountOfNewJoiners = 0; 
            DateTime aMonthAgo = DateTime.now().minusMonths(1);
            for(Member member:team) {
                if(member.startingDate().isAfter(aMonthAgo))
                   amountOfNewJoiners++;
                if(amountOfNewJoiners == 2)
                    return true;
            }
            return false;   
      }
}
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