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Python processing question -- strip out date-time patterns:

I have some data from a GSM unit of the form:

+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,05:15:16+04",25-05-13,05:15:20, 0.668
+CMGL: 2,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,12:15:14+04",25-05-13,12:15:20, 0.875
+CMGL: 3,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,10:15:15+04",25-05-13,10:15:20, 0.679

..

The data is retrieved as a single string-buffer so it's all on a single line initially. I can sort and strip data using DATA.replace(a,b), but I'm unable to delete the first 4 comma separated groups, i.e.

+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","YY/MM/DD,HH:MM:SS+DELTA"

My aim is to extract the data to look like this (I don't mind the wrong order of the date-time lines)-

25-05-13, 05:15:20, 0.668
25-05-13, 12:15:20, 0.875
25-05-13, 10:15:20, 0.679

..

Suggestions welcome

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something like this:

>>> strs = '+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,05:15:16+04",25-05-13,05:15:20, 0.668'
>>> ", ".join( x for x in strs.split(",")[5:] )
'25-05-13, 05:15:20,  0.668'

or:

>>> ", ".join( strs.split(",",5)[-1].split(",") )
'25-05-13, 05:15:20,  0.668'

For multiple lines:

>>> strs = """+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,05:15:16+04",25-05-13,05:15:20, 0.668                                              
+CMGL: 2,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,12:15:14+04",25-05-13,12:15:20, 0.875
+CMGL: 3,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,10:15:15+04",25-05-13,10:15:20, 0.679"""
>>> 
>>> for line in strs.splitlines():     
...     print ", ".join( line.split(",",5)[-1].split(","))

25-05-13, 05:15:20,  0.668
25-05-13, 12:15:20,  0.875
25-05-13, 10:15:20,  0.679
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this works fine for the first line - how would I apply this code to multiple lines? –  Jake French May 26 '13 at 23:44
1  
@JakeFrench I've updated my solution. –  undefined is not a function May 26 '13 at 23:49
    
i.e: DATA = '+CMGL: 1,"REC UNREAD","+11111111111","13/05/26,15:15:13+04",26-05-13,15:15:20,0.626\n+CMGL: 2,"REC UNREAD","+11111111111","13/05/26,21:15:13+04",26-05-13,21:15:20,0.081000' >>> ", ".join( DATA.split(",",5)[-1].split(",") ) >>> >>> '26-05-13, 15:15:20, 0.626\n+CMGL: 2, "REC UNREAD", "+11111111111", "13/05/26, 21:15:13+04", 26-05-13, 21:15:20, 0.081' –  Jake French May 26 '13 at 23:49
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Use the csv module to process delimited files.

gsm.txt

+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,05:15:16+04",25-05-13,05:15:20, 0.668
+CMGL: 2,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,12:15:14+04",25-05-13,12:15:20, 0.875
+CMGL: 3,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,10:15:15+04",25-05-13,10:15:20, 0.679

the example code below

import csv
gsm = open('gsm.txt')
for row in csv.reader(gsm):
    print row[4:]

outputs

['25-05-13', '05:15:20', ' 0.668']
['25-05-13', '12:15:20', ' 0.875']
['25-05-13', '10:15:20', ' 0.679']
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yes I thought about row[N] but the data is in a buffer from the GSM unit. –  Jake French May 26 '13 at 23:40
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data = """+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,05:15:16+04",25-05-13,05:15:20, 0.668
+CMGL: 2,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,12:15:14+04",25-05-13,12:15:20, 0.875
+CMGL: 3,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,10:15:15+04",25-05-13,10:15:20, 0.679"""

import csv
from StringIO import StringIO

for row in csv.reader(StringIO(data), skipinitialspace=True):
    print ', '.join(row[4:7])

#25-05-13, 05:15:20, 0.668
#25-05-13, 12:15:20, 0.875
#25-05-13, 10:15:20, 0.679
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+1 for skipinitialspace –  mtadd May 26 '13 at 23:29
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If you can make sure all line are in similar format, ie the length of prefix words are alwayws the same. I think the simplest way is

line = '+CMGL: 1,"REC READ","+111111111111","13/05/25,05:15:16+04",25-05-13,05:15:20, 0.668'
line = line[59:]
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