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I currently have a Python unittest test case like the following:

from unittest import TestCase as UTestCase

import inspect 

class BaseParentTaskTest(UTestCase):

    def test_case_one(self):
        class A(BaseParentTask):
            def run(self, a, b):
                pass

        instance = A()

        print inspect.getargspec(instance.run).args

        instance._validate()

        if instance.valid:
            self.fail("Failed to invalidate based on wrong argument count.")

    def test_case_two(self):
        class A(BaseParentTask):
            def run(self, a, b, c, d):
                pass

        instance = A()

        print inspect.getargspec(instance.run).args

        if instance.valid:
            self.fail("Failed to invalidate based on wrong argument kw names.")

It seems that from my testing, after running test_case_one, the A class is kept in memory and not overwritten by A in test_case_two when that runs. This causes test_case_two to fail.

This can be seen from the logs. In test_case_one, the expected output is (self, a, b), and it is:

(self, a, b)

In test_case_two, the expected output is (self, a, b, c, d):

(self, a, b)

However, it's clearly not.

Why is the A class not obliterated as soon as the instance method exits? How can I fix this to make my tests pass?

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1  
The A class is obliterated - something else is happening –  Eric May 27 '13 at 0:27
    
Any ideas on how to check that? –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay May 27 '13 at 0:28
    
What does BaseParentTask look like? –  Eric May 27 '13 at 0:28
    
Try printing id(A) and id(type(instance)) in both places. –  Eric May 27 '13 at 0:29
    
A = type('A', (BaseParentTask,), {'run': (lambda self, a, b, c:None)}) –  JBernardo May 27 '13 at 0:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Evidently, Celery is to blame here, as it's doing some weird stuff behind the scenes to make this happen.

By defining the abstract class variable on each of the subclasses, the problem goes away:

class A(BaseParentTask):
    abstract = True
    def run(self, a, b, c, d):
        pass

My understanding was that Celery wouldn't do anything with the class unless it was registered with the @celery.task annotation, but it seems that it internally still registers the class without any explicit request to do so.

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