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Here's my code:

using System;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace TestAsync
{
    class Program
    {
        private const string conn = "Data Source=UNREACHABLESERVER;Initial Catalog=master;Integrated Security=True";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                TestConnection();
            }
            catch
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Caught in main");
            }
        }

        private static async void TestConnection()
        {
            bool connected = false;

            using (var tokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource())
            using (var connection = new SqlConnection(conn))
            {
                tokenSource.CancelAfter(2000);

                try
                {
                    await connection.OpenAsync(tokenSource.Token);
                    connected = true;
                }
                catch(TaskCanceledException)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Caught timeout");
                }
                catch
                {
                    Console.Write("Caught in function");
                }

                if (connected)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Connected!");
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Failed to connect...");
                    throw(new Exception("hi"));
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The output is:

Caught timeout
Failed to connect...

But then my program terminates with an unhandled exception. Instead, I'm wanting my program to have the thrown exception handled in the main thread and print out Caught in main. How can I make that work?

EDIT

Here's my updated code that works the way I want:

using System;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace TestAsync
{
    class Program
    {
        private const string conn = "Data Source=UNREACHABLESERVER;Initial Catalog=MyFiles;Integrated Security=True";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                TestConnection().Wait();
            }
            catch
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Caught in main");
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static async Task TestConnection()
        {
            using (var tokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource())
            using (var connection = new SqlConnection(conn))
            {
                tokenSource.CancelAfter(2000);
                await connection.OpenAsync(tokenSource.Token);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is not possible. Your call to TestConnection() will return (and thus execution on the main thread will continue) once your first await is encountered. Your catch blocks and throwing the exception will execute on another thread and go unobserved by the main thread.

This one just one reason why async void should be avoided. If you need to write an async void function, it must be completely self-contained (including error handling logic). You would be much better off writing an async Task function. The simplest approach would be to modify your call in the Main method to this:

TestConnection().Wait()

This will, of course, cause the main thread to block while executing the function (you'll also have to change the signature to async Task before this will compile).

share|improve this answer
1  
Correct except for the second sentence. async methods always start synchronously. However, even if an exception is thrown during the synchronous portion, it will not be propagated to the caller. –  Stephen Cleary May 27 '13 at 2:47
    
@StephenCleary: True, not sure what I was thinking. Edited to reflect that. –  Adam Robinson May 27 '13 at 2:52

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