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In System.IO there is a function: string File.ReadAllText( string path );

I am trying to write a function that would call File.ReadAllText, take care of all possible exceptions and return true/false and store error message.

What I have is this:

public static class FileNoBS
{
    public static bool ReadAllText( string path, out string text, out string errorMessage )
    {
        errorMessage = null;
        text = null;
        bool operationSuccessful = false;

        try
        {
            text = System.IO.File.ReadAllText( path );
            operationSuccessful = true;
        }
        catch ( ArgumentNullException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "Internal software error - argument null exception in FileNoBs.ReadAllText\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( ArgumentException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "Internal software error - path is a zero-length string, contains only white space, or contains one or more invalid characters as defined by InvalidPathChars in FileNoBs.ReadAllText.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( PathTooLongException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "The specified path was too long.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( DirectoryNotFoundException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "The specified directory was not found.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( FileNotFoundException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "The file specified in path was not found.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( IOException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "An I/O error occurred while opening the file.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( UnauthorizedAccessException e )
        {
            errorMessage = @"UnauthorizedAccessException

path specified a file that is read-only.
-or-
This operation is not supported on the current platform.
-or-
path specified a directory.
-or-
The caller does not have the required permission.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( NotSupportedException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "path is in an invalid format.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }
        catch ( SecurityException e )
        {
            errorMessage = "You do not have the required permission.\nMessage: " + e.Message;
        }

        return operationSuccessful;
    }
}

I don't understand how how control flow goes with functions that return value. Let's say UnauthorizedAccessException gets caught, errorMessage is set to

    errorMessage = "You do not have the required permission..."

I know that finally gets executed every time, but compiler won't let me do return inside finally block. So will my return get reached or not?

Another question is how to simplify this while still following official guidelines: "In general, you should only catch those exceptions that you know how to recover from. "

I dread going through all functions that I will need from File class (Move, Copy, Delete, ReadAllText, WriteAllText) and then Directory class and doing all these long blocks of code just to catch all exceptions I don't care about and not catch too many of them cause Microsoft says it's bad.

Thank you.

EDIT: I got comments like this is not handling exceptions this is "something else".

I am client for my code and I want to do something like this:

if ( !FileNoBS.ReadAllText( path, text, errorMessage ) ) {
   MessageBox.Show( errorMessage );
   return;
}
// continue working with all errors taken care of - don't care for whatever reason file wasn't opened and read, user is notified and I am moving on with my life
share|improve this question
    
you are not taking care of all exceptions you are merely translating theminto a "tuple"of a bool and a string making it harder for the client to figure out what happenedwhich is breaking the guideline you are trying to follow "Don't handle them if you don't know how to" –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 5:47
    
I think you are better off handling the exceptions at a higher level and simply displaying the exception message rather than manually setting each message. Also, do you really need to return a boolean? Might be better off simply returning the text from the file. –  Ned Stoyanov May 27 '13 at 5:54
    
Still not quite sure why you don't like the concept of exceptions, but how about you use something like this: public static bool ReadAllText(string path, out string text, out string exMsg) { text = null; exMsg = null; try { text = File.ReadAllText(path); return true; } catch (Exception ex) { exMsg = ex.Message; return false; } }? –  Corak May 27 '13 at 6:01
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your return will be reached as there isn't a return in the try block or the catch block.

Generally, you only want to catch exceptions that you expect may occur and have a way of handling them. For example, you may want to handle the file not being found from the given path and return a default file instead. You should allow other exceptions not to be caught so you know that something unexpected has happened and not hide it by catching all exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
But won't this crash my program? Also I am handling all exceptions by displaying the message to user and letting him deal with it. I certainly won't bother to fix security privileges or whatever. That's his job. If he has selected a file to open in OpenFileDialog and then deleted it before I got a chance to open it - I should just notify him and not bother, right? –  Marko May 27 '13 at 6:21
    
@Marko those exceptions that you can recover from you should recover from. THat is if the user chooses a file that doesn't exist tell the user to pick another. Most of the exceptions you have listen will only happen if you do not do propper input validation. Eg. if the path is null –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 6:26
    
Displaying the message is not really handling it. And there might be some errors you could really handle, just not inside that method, but maybe in one of the calling methods. For example for "File not found" you don't need to show that error message, just tell the user to select another file. But if you really just want to display a message, then you can just use e.Message() with the added feature, that the message will be in the language of the user (UILanguage). –  Corak May 27 '13 at 6:27
    
Thank you. This still leaves me with 40+ lines of code just to display a message (and not catch any exception not thrown by File.ReadAllText). That's why I don't like exceptions. –  Marko May 27 '13 at 6:32
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Instead of catching the exceptions you should try to avoid the situation that will lead to those exceptions being thrown in the first place. In your case you should have some input validation before calling ReadAllText

  • never accept a path that is null - you know this will lead to an exception so handle it before it does
  • never accept a path that leads to a file that does not exist - use File.Exists(path) prior to the call
  • never accept a malformed path E.g. the empty string or one with invalid characters - this will lead to an exception

These tests should be performed where the input originates. That is if the user types them in, validate them before using them. If they come from a DB or somewhere else validate there before use. If it's not user input they are all indications of a system error and should be treated as such, not as something the user should worry about.

Security exceptions can be somewhat harder to test up front and in many cases it is exceptional to get a violation and therefor perfectly ok to get an exception. It shouldn't crash the program of course but be handled with an errormessage to the user (if it's based on user input, if it's system generated data that leads to this, it's an idication of a system error that should be fixed at code level). It's often more appropriate to do this where the call happens than in some library method.

for IOExceptions they can be put into two buckets. Recoverable once (usually a retry) and unrecoverable once. As a minimum give the user feedback on the exception, so the user might have the option of retrying.

A very general rule that should be part of the error correction logic is to never have invalid data floating around the system. Make sure that all objects manage the invariants (Tools are available for this such as code contracts). Reject invalid input from the user (or other systems) when they are received instead of when they result in an exception.

If you do all the input validation and still have E.g. ArgumentNullException then that points to an error in the logic of the program, something that you want to be able to easily find in a test and correct before you release the bug. You shouldn't try and mask this error.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I agree with everything but this - "It's often more appropriate to do this where the call happens than in some library method." I want to do this in one place in program because if I read a file from 10 places in program I want to do so in 3 lines of code instead of 10 or 20. –  Marko May 27 '13 at 7:06
    
@m)arko I didn't say that you couldn't do it in one plac, if you have the same functionality in ten places why do you implement that 10 times? If it's not the same functionality when you read a file, then by definition the recovery plan must be different (otherwise you can still factor out the common part –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 7:27
    
I can't forsee a situation where I would want to do anything else other then letting the user know error has occured and file could not be read. What other recovery plan could there be? –  Marko May 27 '13 at 7:33
    
@marko you are the one that knows your application. So I take your word for it. However your code does not do that. THere's no notification to the user. You've wrapped a call with logic to convert an exception to a bool and an error message. You'll then in ten different places have to test that bool and display an error message to the user. I'm saying encapsulate the common logic of those ten places including the notification to the user –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 7:38
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The return statement is going to be called in case of any exception in your code, before it is placed at the end of the program before it exits.

I will suggest placing a single exception handler with a high level Exception type, like the 'Exception' type itself, and print or log the exception message. Specifying so many exception handlers in each method is going to take a lot of energy which your should actually put in the method itself.

        try
        {
            return ReadAllText("path", "text", "error");
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(exception);
        }
        return false;

So if the method gets called, it will return immediately, otherwise the exception gets printed/logged and the method will return false.

You can however, mention a couple or few explicit exception handlers in some cases, where you think it will be beneficial.

share|improve this answer
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Yes It will return the value.

But, better you handle return value in finally statement.

If in any case you want to return operationSuccessful value, then write finally block after catch blocks as follows,

finally
{
  return operationSuccessful;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
No it's not good practice it's a compile error since you can't return from a finally block –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 5:52
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As I said in my comment, you are better off handling the exceptions at a higher level and simply displaying the exception message rather than manually setting each message. I think in this case the message from the exception will be descriptive enough.

    public static class FileNoBS
    {
        public static string ReadAllText(string path)
        {
            return System.IO.File.ReadAllText( path );
        }   
    }

then use it like this at some higher level in your application. I typically have a general handler to handle all application exceptions and log them and display a message box if necessary.

    try
    {
        var text = FileNoBS.ReadAllText("file.ext");
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Definitely the best approach. I would also add that some of the exceptions can be handled by good programming - i.e., checking for missing arguments, checking that the file or directory exists, etc. –  Tim May 27 '13 at 6:04
    
ReadAllText as a wrapper for ReadAllText seems a bit weird, but other than that: +1 –  Corak May 27 '13 at 6:06
    
I tought this higher level exception handling should happen in main function and here I should just caught any error that can go wrong while opening file and reading text from it and display that to user? –  Marko May 27 '13 at 6:25
    
I think it's better to display it to the user from the higher level function. If you want, in your ReadAllText function, you can add more info to your exception by catching it and then throwing an exception with a more suitable message –  Ned Stoyanov May 27 '13 at 6:32
add comment

Provided no other error occurs, yes.

I'd add at the end:

catch (Exception e)
{
    errormessage = "An unexpected error has occured.";
}

return operationSuccessful;

Though, this will always return the successful even if you got an error. I'm not sure if that's what you want, or if your variables are badly named.

share|improve this answer
    
you can't return from a finally and catching an exception that you don't know how to handle is bad practice. catching all exceptions with out handling them makes for "interesting" debugging scenarios at best –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 5:49
    
@RuneFS oops, forgot about that. Though you didn't seem to jump on Freelancer as fast as me. –  Tyanna May 27 '13 at 5:51
    
that's true (and was because I hadn't read it yet) however the DV was in your case not for the finally but for the advocation of catching all exceptions and basically ignoring them –  Rune FS May 27 '13 at 5:58
    
@RuneFS ~ I meant in addition to the specific ones, add one final one to catch any unexpected expectations, not catch all of them this way. Which is why I said, "at the end." –  Tyanna May 27 '13 at 6:01
    
@RuneFS - but the OP specifically want's to "take care of all possible exceptions". Okay, so maybe he shouldn't do it with "An unexpected error has occured." but with e.Message(). –  Corak May 27 '13 at 6:08
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