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This thing has me stumped. I have a class as follows:

public class SpecialList implements List<MyType> {
    // overriden methods
}

Now I have the following method contract to respect in a higher class:

public class MyClass {
    private List<SpecialList> bigList = new ArrayList<SpecialList>();

    public void doStuff(List<MyType> list)
    {
        bigList.add((SpecialList)list); // does not compile - invalid cast
    }
}

I really am not sure what I am doing wrong here. I have a class that implements the List<MyType> interface, yet I can't cast that class to a List<MyType>? That doesn't make any sense to me.

I am lost. What am I supposed to do to make this work? I suppose this has something to do with generics covariance but at this point I don't know what is wrong here. Can someone point in the right direction? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
what do you wants to do here? do you want to add teh contents of list to bigList or add list to bigList –  Arun P Johny May 27 '13 at 6:42
    
Probably you need is addAll() bigList.addAll(list); –  Arun P Johny May 27 '13 at 6:44
    
@ArunPJohny I want bigList to be a list of MyLists, i.e. a list of list of MyType. So addAll isn't appropriate here I think. –  Thomas May 27 '13 at 6:49
    
@ruakh It's the same list in both. I will change the question as you said, it is unclear I agree. –  Thomas May 27 '13 at 6:50
2  
its compiling in my eclipse :O –  anshulkatta May 27 '13 at 7:17

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You defined List<MyList> (i.e. list of MyList). This means that you can add there instances of MyList only. If you are using addAll() you can add list of MyList. But you are trying to add List<MyType>. MyType is definitely not MyList.

And you obviously cannot cast List to MyList.

share|improve this answer
2  
Re: "you obviously cannot cast List to MyList": I wouldn't say "obviously", since that is exactly what the OP is asking about. (And it's not obvious to me, either.) –  ruakh May 27 '13 at 6:43

not every List<MyType> (Animal) is MyList (Cow)

you are adding animals to list of cows

share|improve this answer
    
So how can I maintain the contract of the doStuff method while still having a derived list type? Do I really need to have my own list use a generic type and cast it to MyType in every single method?? –  Thomas May 27 '13 at 6:53

I would suggest some parameters :

public class MyClass{
    private List<List<MyType>> bigList = new ArrayList<List<MyType>>();

    public <E extends List<MyType>> void doStuff(E list)
    {
        bigList.add(list);
    }
}

When you retrieve an element from your bigList however you cannot specialize the element as it comes from a generic list. If you absolutely need to cast it, maybe your class architecture is not correct. Or you could abusively do this :

public class MyClass{
    private List<List<MyType>> bigList = new ArrayList<List<MyType>>();

    public <E extends List<MyType>> void doStuff(E list)
    {
        bigList.add(list);
    }

    public <E extends List<MyType>> E getStuff(Class<E> myType,int i)
    {
        List<MyType> obj = bigList.get(i);
        if(myType.isInstance(obj)) return (E) obj;
        throw new SomeErrorHere("invalid type for index");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

From what I recall the proper way to typecast list is with the use of generics. Something like:

bigList.add((List<MyList>)(List<?>)list);

However I am not sure of the theory behind this code.

share|improve this answer
    
This is bad advice; it's certainly not "the proper way". The only time you would need to go through a superfluous List<?> is if you're actually casting incompatibly, e.g. you have a List<Object> and you want to re-dub it a List<String> (or vice versa). The only reason you can get away with it is that these casts can't be checked at runtime. –  ruakh May 27 '13 at 6:53

Why is this error occurring

The code is formally correct. You can cast almost any object to any other object and the code will compile. If the cast is invalid, there will be a runtime ClassCastException thrown.

Your IDE can detect unsure casts and complain about them during compile time. Either as a warning or as an error. It is a matter of configuration. Apparently OPs IDE is configured to make such code smells a compile error

Why is this cast unsafe

You can answer your question by answering this:

Can you create a List<MyType> that is not a SpecialList?

You can not cast a List<MyType> to SpecialList because there may be objects which will be List<MyType> and will really not be SpecialList.

Solutions

Change your app architecture

There are two things you can do - either use the class SpecialList all accross your code, or use the generic List<MyType>.

In other words, either change:

doStuff(List<MyType> list) to doStuff(SpecialList list)

or change the

private List<SpecialList> bigList to private List<List<MyType>> bigList

You have to decide whether you want a generic interface list or your own class used everywhere. Remember, that you can alaways cast SpecialList to List<MyType>, because all SpecialList instances are also instances of List<MyType>. It does not work the other way around.

Make sure the cast will always be valid

If you absolutely HAVE TO make this design work, use instanceof to check if the list is really a SpecialList. Like that:

public void doStuff(List<MyType> list)
{
    if (list instanceof SpecialList) {
        bigList.add((SpecialList)list);
    } else {
        SpecialList sl = new SpecialList(list); // I hope you have that constructor
        bigList.add(sl);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So how can I maintain the contract of the doStuff method while still having a derived list type? Do I really need to have my own list use a generic type and cast object parameters to MyType in every single method?? –  Thomas May 27 '13 at 6:57
    
@Thomas I edited my answer. –  Dariusz May 27 '13 at 7:03
    
Neither of these options are acceptable. The first alternative breaks the doStuff method contract and the second alternative makes it impossible to control access of the MyType elements via the inner list (SpecialList). I know it's a horrible class design but I have to make it work somehow. –  Thomas May 27 '13 at 7:07
    
@Thomas added the instanceof check; please make sure you properly the not instanceof case. –  Dariusz May 27 '13 at 7:11
    
@Thomas I edited the answer once more. I hope everything is clear now. Just add the instanceof check I posted and you'll be good. –  Dariusz May 27 '13 at 7:52

This works in my Eclipse , this is class SpecialList , Hello is MyType kind of class

package a;

import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.ListIterator;

public class SpecialList implements List<Hello> {

    //Overridden methods
    }

This one is Myclass

package a;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class MyClass {
    private List<SpecialList> bigList = new ArrayList<SpecialList>();

    public void doStuff(List<Hello> list)
    {
        bigList.add((SpecialList)list);  //compiles good
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new MyClass().doStuff(null);
    }
}

No compile time error or Runtime Exception

share|improve this answer
    
You have different eclipse settings than the OP. You will get a runtime ClassCastException in case the list is not a SpecialList. –  Dariusz May 27 '13 at 7:23
    
yes ofcourse i will get exception if it is not SpecialList , but here it is not giving any compiler error , OP is saying a compile time error !! –  anshulkatta May 27 '13 at 7:24
    
Go to your eclipse settings, in warnigns/errors section you can select what kind of reaction should Eclipse have if it detects such cases; it can be treated as a compile time error, or it can be ignored. It's up to the programmer to set these. I like them to be as defensive as possible, you apparently do not. It's your choice. –  Dariusz May 27 '13 at 7:27
    
your point is not addressing any of this , does OP declare any eclipse or compiler setting change ?? –  anshulkatta May 27 '13 at 7:29
    
@Dariusz: Can you give more details about this option? My version of Eclipse does not seem to have it; when I open my preferences and filter the Errors/Warnings section by cast, the only option that appears is the setting for "Unnecessary cast or 'instanceof' operation". –  ruakh May 27 '13 at 8:23
List <MyList> is not same as List <MyType>.

Lets make it simple ,look at the next few lines :

 *List<MyList> myList = new ArrayList<MyList>(); //1
  myList.add(new MyType);//2 ......Compile ERROR*

If you try to add MyType instance into List<MyList> it will give ERROR.

Why :

  • Generics means parameterized type.
  • Generic adds the TYPE SAFETY.
  • That means ,With generic all cast are automatic and implicit ,
    they dont require typecasting while adding and retriving the object
    from list explictly.

Real Time Scenario:

If the department of motor vehicles supplies a list of drivers. We think that a List<Driver> is a List<Person>,assuming that Driver is a subtype of Person.

If that the case , We could add new people who are NOT drivers into the list.

That is All Person are NOT Drivers .

Solution to above problem :

You can use Wildcards with Generics . Check this link from doc http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/wildcards.html

share|improve this answer
    
This is not the case. He is adding a list to a list of lists. –  Dariusz May 27 '13 at 7:46

Based on comments

@ArunPJohny I want bigList to be a list of MyLists, i.e. a list of list of MyType. So addAll isn't appropriate here I think

You need to declare SpecialList to be of generic type List<List<MyType>>

public class SpecialList implements List<List<MyType>> {
    // overriden methods
}

Then

public class MyClass {
    private SpecialList bigList = new SpecialList();

    public void doStuff(List<MyType> list)
    {
        bigList.add(list);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That makes no sense; it still wouldn't let him cast from List<MyType> to SpecialList, and it still wouldn't let him write bigList.add(specialList). I really don't see what it would accomplish. –  ruakh May 27 '13 at 6:55
    
@ruakh what he need is to add a List<MyType> to SpecialList that is what I understood from the quoted comment and it will help him achieve this. The casting to SpecialList looks like a desperate attempt to achieve that with what he had –  Arun P Johny May 27 '13 at 7:04
    
No, he needs to add a List<MyType> to a List<SpecialList>. And your posted code-snippet is obviously quite broken, even aside from the nonsense code-comment that you included. –  ruakh May 27 '13 at 7:09
    
@ruakh updated the answer –  Arun P Johny May 27 '13 at 7:26
    
Your current version should compile -- great -- but now you need to give some sort of argument for why it's better than what he's already got. –  ruakh May 27 '13 at 7:32

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