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Ok so I have two classes that look like:

class Item
{
    private:
        HANDLE Parent;

    public:
        Item(const Item &I) = delete;
        Item(Item &&I) = delete;
        void SetParent(HANDLE Handle);

        Item& operator = (const Item &I) = delete;
        Item& operator = (Item &&I);
};

void Item::SetParent(HANDLE Handle)
{
    this->Parent = Handle;
}

Item& Item::operator = (Item&& I) {/*Do Move Here*/}


class Box
{
    private:
        HANDLE Handle;

    public:
        void Add(const Item &I);
};

void Box::Add(const Item &I)
{
    I.SetParent(this->Handle);   //Error.. Item I is const.
}

I get the error that I is const and that makes sense but I need a way to SetParent of Item I without losing the ability to construct I in place as so:

Box B(Item());

instead of:

Item I;
Box B(I);

Any ideas how I can keep inline construction of I while being able to modify it by calling SetParent?

share|improve this question
2  
Rvalues references. –  Xeo May 27 '13 at 7:30
    
Does that mean I'd have to create two functions? One that takes just a reference (non-const) and one that takes RValue Reference so that I don't lose Non-Inline construction? –  Brandon May 27 '13 at 7:38
1  
Yes, it needs two constructors - or just one, if you can make it a template (read up on "Universal reference"s). –  Xeo May 27 '13 at 8:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A solution is to declare the Parent member as mutable and to make the SetParent method constant. A sample code is following and available online

typedef int HANDLE;

class Item
{
    private:
        mutable HANDLE Parent;

    public:
        Item(const Item &I) = delete;
        Item(Item &&I) = delete;
        void SetParent(HANDLE Handle) const;

        Item& operator = (const Item &I) = delete;
        Item& operator = (Item &&I);
};

void Item::SetParent(HANDLE Handle) const
{
    this->Parent = Handle;
}

class Box
{
    private:
        HANDLE Handle;

    public:
        void Add(const Item &I);
    public:
         Box(const Item &I) {
            Add(I);
         }
};

void Box::Add(const Item &I)
{
    I.SetParent(this->Handle);   //Error.. Item I is const.
}

int main(void) {
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
mutable should only be used for invisible state - having or not having a parent doesn't pass as "invisible state", atleast to me. –  Xeo May 27 '13 at 8:07
    
Hmm I've never seen that keyword mutable before. Perhaps for good reason, perhaps for bad. That actually looks pretty cool. I ended up using the R-Value reference as mentioned earlier. I'll accept this though as it piqued my interest and its the only answer at this time. –  Brandon May 27 '13 at 8:27

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