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While reading linux source code, I have read the following code:

void fastcall add_wait_queue(wait_queue_head_t *q, wait_queue_t *wait) { unsigned long flags; wait->flags &= ~WQ_FLAG_EXCLUSIVE; spin_lock_irqsave(&q->lock, flags); __add_wait_queue(q, wait); spin_unlock_irqrestore(&q->lock, flags); } EXPORT_SYMBOL(add_wait_queue); void fastcall add_wait_queue_exclusive(wait_queue_head_t *q, wait_queue_t *wait) { unsigned long flags; wait->flags |= WQ_FLAG_EXCLUSIVE; spin_lock_irqsave(&q->lock, flags); __add_wait_queue_tail(q, wait); spin_unlock_irqrestore(&q->lock, flags); } EXPORT_SYMBOL(add_wait_queue_exclusive);


The difference is between __add_wait_queue() and __add_wait_queue_tail().
Why the implementaion differs in this step?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

In exclusive case, only the first process will be woken up, so it must be the one waiting longest.

In non-exclusive all processes are going to be woken up, so the order does not matter and inserting to head is easier for singly-linked list.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. It seems the wait queue is impemented with doubly-linked list, as my version 2.6.11. – wilsonwen May 27 '13 at 8:51
    
@wilsonwen: Than it's probably simply the version that looks more default in the case where the order isn't important. – Jan Hudec May 27 '13 at 14:01

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