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I would like to find missing pairs from a file, in the following manner:

<itemA>
  <idA="312" />
</itemA>

<itemB>
  <idB="312" /> # has a corresponding itemA
</itemB>

<itemB>
  <idB="313" /> # doesn't have a corresponding itemA
</itemB>

I'm not even totally sure what tool to use for this (sed, awk, grep).

share|improve this question
    
you need a xml parser to deal with xml. – kev May 27 '13 at 8:56
    
I just want to compare if there exists a pair of idB="x" and idA="x". I don't think it requires an xml parser. – JHollanti May 27 '13 at 9:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using GNU grep and uniq:

$ grep -Po '(?<=id[AB]=")[0-9]+' file | uniq -u
313

If your input isn't in sorted order:

$ grep -Po '(?<=id[AB]=")[0-9]+' file | sort -n | uniq -u
313
share|improve this answer
1  
Short, sweet and works :) – JHollanti May 27 '13 at 10:15

Try this script:

#!/bin/bash

grep -oP '(?<=idA=")[0-9]+' input.xml | sort > a.txt

grep -oP '(?<=idB=")[0-9]+' input.xml | sort > b.txt

diff -y a.txt b.txt

The following would obviate the need of creating temporary files:

diff -y <(grep -oP '(?<=idA=")[0-9]+' input.xml) <(grep -oP '(?<=idB=")[0-9]+' input.xml)
share|improve this answer
    
This solution will find matches throughout the file, regardless of their position. This might be intended; the OP doesn't say clearly enough. – Alfe May 27 '13 at 9:15
    
The <(…) lacks the sorting. But as stated before, whether this is wanted by the OP or not, I cannot say. – Alfe May 27 '13 at 9:17
    
+1 for brevity of the solution. But in case the input is an endless stream, your version won't work because diff only works on limited input. I don't think that will be a problem here, though. – Alfe May 27 '13 at 9:25

You task, in general, will require an XML parser because of the freedom of formatting XML. Your input could as well look like this

<itemA>
  <
idA
=
"312" />
</itemA>

<itemB>
  <
idB
=
"312" /> # has a corresponding itemA
</itemB>

<itemB>
  <
idB
=
"313" /> # doesn't have a corresponding itemA
</itemB>

and still be valid XML with the same meaning as your example. Parsing this (and other possible nastinesses I didn't point out) without a proper XML parser is a futile task.

But if you know sth more about the formatting of your input than only that it will be valid XML, you can of course use grepping to find matching pairs.

For instance, in case you know that the formatting always is as you posted it,

valueA=""
grep '<id[AB]=' | while true
do
  if [ "$valueA" = "" ]
  then
    IFS='=' read dummy valueA
  fi
  IFS='=' read dummy valueB
  if [ "$valueA" != "$valueB" ]
  then
    echo "Missing B for $valueA"
    valueA=$valueB
  else
    valueA=""
  fi
done

can be used to iterate through the whole input.

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