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In the snippet below, a task creates two child tasks using the TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent, which means the parent task will wait for the child tasks to finish.

Question is - why doesn't the parent task return correct value [102]? Does it first determine its return value and then wait for the child tasks to finish. If so, then what is the point of creating parent-child relationship?

void Main()
{
Console.WriteLine ("Main start.");
int i = 100;

Task<int> t1 = new Task<int>(()=> 
{
    Console.WriteLine ("In parent start");
    Task c1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Interlocked.Increment(ref i);
        Console.WriteLine ("In child 1:" + i);
    }, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent);

    Task c2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
        Thread.Sleep(2000);
        Interlocked.Increment(ref i);           
        Console.WriteLine ("In child 2:" + i);
    }, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent );

    Console.WriteLine ("In parent end");
    return i;
}); 

t1.Start();
Console.WriteLine ("Calling Result.");
Console.WriteLine (t1.Result);
Console.WriteLine ("Main end.");
}

The output:

Main start.
Calling Result.
In parent start
In parent end
In child 1:101
In child 2:102
100
Main end.
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2 Answers 2

The problem is that you create c1 and c2 as separate tasks but then return i immediately from t1 before c1 and c2 have incremented i.

Thus, the return value from t1 is captured at that point, and is still 100.

As you noted, there isn't much point in a parent/child relationship for this arrangement; but there are plenty of cases where it does make sense.

A common use is just so that the parent task does not complete until its child tasks have completed, but if you require the parent task to wait for its children before returning a value, you will not be able to do it like this.

Of course, you can fix it by adding

Task.WaitAll(c1, c2);

just before the return i;. I know it's not what you're asking, but I just wanted to point that out anyway.

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Yes waiting and returning value are different things, but why not wait before deciding upon the return value. Do you think this could be a bug in TPL? –  thewpfguy May 28 '13 at 6:35
    
@thewpfguy No, it's definitely not a bug. It's a natural consequence of the fact that the result of a task is cached if it exits before the task that started the first task accesses the first task's return value. –  Matthew Watson May 28 '13 at 6:48

As already said the value of i is returned before it's incremented. changing your code in this way it return the expected value (102):

void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine ("Main start.");
    int i = 100;

    Task<int> t1 = new Task<int>(()=> 
    {


    Console.WriteLine ("In parent start");
    Task c1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
        Interlocked.Increment(ref i);
        Console.WriteLine ("In child 1:" + i);
    }, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent);

    Thread.Sleep(1000);

    Task c2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
        Interlocked.Increment(ref i);           
        Console.WriteLine ("In child 2:" + i);
    }, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent );

    Thread.Sleep(1000);

    Console.WriteLine ("In parent end");
    return i;
}); 

t1.Start();
Console.WriteLine ("Calling Result.");
Console.WriteLine (t1.Result);
Console.WriteLine ("Main end.");
 }

what I did is simply take out the Thread.Sleep(1000) from the child task to the parent task. The result is returned now after the variable has been incremented.

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2  
This is terrible answer IMO. Sleeps were added into child tasks to simulate long work. Moving them to main task is poor man's synchronization mechanism. Sure it will work, unless child taks will take more than 1000ms to complete. Given that we have many, many ways to synchronize data in .NET - using sleep to do this is the worst possible solution you should never use –  Pako May 27 '13 at 10:37
    
@Pako I agree with you but I just wanted to point out why the int variable wasn't being updated at the end of the two tasks. –  JohnField May 27 '13 at 10:49

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