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I am a Perl newbie. I am trying to delete all files with a certain extension in a directory (A) and all its subdirectories (B,C). I have learnt how to do so for a given directory but not recursively. That is the following does the job in the A directory but not in the B, C sub-directories.

use strict;    
use warnings;    
my $dir = "~/A/";    
unlink glob "$dir/*.log";

I have tried with

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find;
my $dir = "~/A";
find(\&wanted, $dir);
sub wanted { 
unlink glob "*.log";
}

but then I get a message: Can't stat ~/A: No such file or directory. While the directory is there. Any hint? Mario

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try with $ENV{"HOME"} instead of ~ which is shell specific,

use strict;    
use warnings;    
my $dir = "$ENV{HOME}/A";
unlink glob "$dir/*.log";
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! Thanks a lot. –  mariodrumblue May 27 '13 at 11:53
1  
@mariodrumblue Why is this marked as the answer? This doesn't fix the issue of unlinking log files in the B, C sub-directories. –  chrsblck May 27 '13 at 15:53
    
@chrsblck. It actually fixed the issue of unlinking in the child directories B and C. At least for me. That is why I marked as the answer. –  mariodrumblue May 28 '13 at 11:48
    
@mariodrumblue Yes it will "do the job", but poorly. File::Find recurses through your directory tree from the given path. So you should use it as designed. You're going to end up with the same problem @mirkobrankovic had with his answer. Which I cleaned up. –  chrsblck May 29 '13 at 7:12
    
@chrsblck. Agreed, it does the job but poorly. I post below my newer version, based on the comments posted on this topic. It should be better and show how to do it simultaneously for several extensions, not just log. Hopefully the code is ok and can be useful to other newbies. use strict; use warnings; use File::Find; my $dir = "$ENV{HOME}/A"; find(\&wanted, $dir); sub wanted { m/\.(log|tex|mat|eps|tif|dta)$/ and do { unlink $_ or warn qq|Could not unlink file _$\n| } } –  mariodrumblue May 29 '13 at 13:56

In your second script, inside the find function don't do another search because that function already traverses the tree using recursion. Simply compare if the file is a log and delete it. A one-liner:

perl -MFile::Find -e '
    find( 
        sub { m/\.log$/ and do { unlink $_ or warn qq|Could not unlink file _$\n| } 
        }, 
        shift 
    )
' .

It accepts an argument, . in my case to begin the search at current directory.

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thanks man, since I have started to learn Perl today I have a bit of trouble to fully understand your script, but I'll give it a go in the next days. –  mariodrumblue May 27 '13 at 14:37
1  
I like this answer. Some of the other answers and the original question are confused about what File::find does and what glob does. File::find visits all the files and directories from the starting directory, so there is no need to use glob. As an experiment I suggest that @mariodrumblue (and others) try the original script but replacing the unlink glob "*.log"; with print "unlink glob *.log for $File::Find::name\n". –  AdrianHHH May 27 '13 at 16:37
    
@AdrianHHH. Thanks. Replacing with "unlink glob *.log for $File::Find::name\n" made me understand what is going on. Glob is great when looking in a directory, but File::find goes down the root all to way to the file, so glob is no longer needed. Using the matching operator m/ is enough. –  mariodrumblue May 28 '13 at 12:01

Are you running on Linux? If so, I have an alternate solution which might help. I'm going on the basis that without stating the language required, the problem is "I need to delete all files with a certain extension, and do it recursively". If this is part of a larger bit of work, ignore my answer, if you're just doing some admin, it might work:

find . -type f -name "*.ext" -exec rm {} \;

This will find all of the files in the current directory and below, then pass their paths to the rm command.

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no I am working in Mac OS X. I have been writing basic shell scripts but now I want to learn Perl. Thanks for the tip anyway! –  mariodrumblue May 27 '13 at 11:52
    
No worries! Hopefully it will come in handy in the future. –  chooban May 27 '13 at 12:51

You are right that glob with not recurse into child directories.

I would run the following code as-is so you can visualize what it's doing. Once you understand you can either turn $DEBUG off or remove that from the code.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;
use File::Find;

my $path = "$ENV{HOME}/A";
my $DEBUG = 1;

find(\&wanted, $path);

sub wanted {
    return if ! -e; 

    my $file = $File::Find::name;

    if ($DEBUG) {
        if( $file =~ /\.log$/ ) { 
            print "Log file found: $file\n"
        } else {
            print "Non-log file found: $file\n";
        }   
    } else {
        # anything that ends with '.log'
        unlink $file if $file =~ /\.log$/;
    }   
}
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I wouldn't bother with glob if you're already using find. Might as well simply find the files you want and delete them:

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find;
use Env qw(HOME);

use constant {
    SUFFIX_LIST => qr/\.(log|foo|bar)$/,
    DIR_TO_CHECK => $HOME,
};

@file_list;

find ( sub {
    return unless -f;
    return unless $_ ~= SUFFIX_LIST;
    push @file_list, $File::Find::name;
}, DIR_TO_CHECK );

unlink @file_list;

I've defined a regular expression (That's the qr/.../) that defines the list of suffixes I'm interested in. I set my constant SUFFIX_LIST to this regular expression. If my file's name matches my regular expression, it's a file I want to delete.

I define a @file_list which I do mainly out of habit and because of the way find works. I am not a big find fan, but that's what we have. The problem is that find wants all of your code inside the find subroutine and this is a bad practice. To get around this, I have my find subroutine push files I want into an array, then operate on that array.

In this particular program, I could have done my unlink right in the find since it is so short. However, most of the time, you're better off using this technique.

The find function uses two special package variables, $File::Find::name and $file::Find::dir. The first is the name of the file with the full path on it starting with the name of the directory given to the find command. The second is the name of the directory (full path). The find function also sets $_ to the current file name. Since find is actually in the directory with the file, $_ has no directory name on it, and can be used to test the file.

I do two tests: 1). Is this a file?, and 2). Does this file's name end with one of the suffixes I'm interested in. (Note that the first, I can simply use unless -f while the second, I must specify the $_ variable.).

If the file is a file and has the right suffix, I push it into my @file_list array.

I prefer to embed my wanted subroutine into my find command. It keeps the function together with the code that affects it. The following two are equivalent:

find ( sub {
    return unless -f;
    return unless $_ ~= SUFFIX_LIST;
    push @file_list, $File::Find::name;
}, DIR_TO_CHECK );

and

find (\&wanted, DIR_TO_CHECK );

sub wanted {
    return unless -f;
    return unless $_ ~= SUFFIX_LIST;
    push @file_list, $File::Find::name;
};

I use constants for things that really are constants. It's a good programming habit. Perl constants are a bit funky in that they have no sigil on them. Thus, you have to be careful whenever you use them where they could be confused with a string.

I also use use Env to pull in environment variables I want to define, and only those. I could pull them in via the $ENV{HOME} construct. It depends upon your preferences. The $ENV{..} construct makes it clear you're pulling in an environment variable. The use Env is cleaner looking.

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It seems that Find::File has problem with "~" mark cause when I try to replace it with for example /root/ it works fine: So as @mpapec sugested change it to $ENV{HOME}

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find;
my $dir = "$ENV{HOME}/A";
find(\&wanted, $dir);
sub wanted {
unlink glob "*.log";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a bad example: the combination of glob and File::Find. –  chrsblck May 29 '13 at 7:04

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