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.section .data
msgI:
 .ascii "x = y\n"
msgI_end:


msgM:
 .ascii "x > y\n"
msgM_end:


msgL:
 .ascii "x < y\n"
msgL_end:


.section .text
.globl main
main:
    movl $5, %eax		     #x = 5
    movl $5, %ebx		     #y = 10
    cmp %ebx, %eax

    je IGUAL

    jg  MAYOR

    jl  MENOR

IGUAL:                       #Esta seccion de cogido se encarga
    movl $4, %eax			 #de imprimir si x = y usando 		
    movl $1, %ebx			 #los system calls de Linux		
    pushl $msgI
    call printf				
    #movl $size, %edx			
    int $0x80							
    jmp EXIT

MAYOR:                       #Esta seccion de cogido se encarga
    movl $4, %eax			 #de imprimir si x > y usando		
    movl $1, %ebx			 #los system calls de Linux		
    pushl $msgM
    call printf				
    #movl $size, %edx			
    int $0x80							
    jmp EXIT

MENOR:                       #Esta seccion de cogido se encarga
    movl $4, %eax			 #de imprimir si x < y usando		
    movl $1, %ebx			 #los system calls de Linux		
    pushl $msgL
    call printf				
    #movl $size, %edx			
    int $0x80							
    jmp EXIT

EXIT:
    movl $1, %eax            #System calls para salir del programa
    int $0x80
share|improve this question
    
So it's not printing msgI as expected? –  Michael Todd Nov 4 '09 at 22:40
    
Is there a question? –  bluebrother Nov 4 '09 at 22:46
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted
    movl $5, %ebx                    #y = 10

Code does not match comments.

    int $0x80                                                   
    jmp EXIT

Why are you calling the interrupt? printf is already done printing, and has overwritten registers like %eax.

Now, the reason why you're getting your messages all jumbled together: printf takes a NUL-terminated string. If it doesn't see a '\0', it keeps on going.

Solution: add a \0 to the end of your msg* strings. printf will then stop printing there.

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot about this earlier, but if you're using NASM: using .asciiz "abc" is equivalent to .ascii "abc\0". Which you choose is up to you. –  ephemient Dec 2 '09 at 22:36
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