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I am using boost pool as a static memory provider,

void func()
{
  std::vector<int, boost::pool_allocator<int> > v;
  for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    v.push_back(13);
}

In above code, how we can fix the size of pool, i mean as we know boost::pool provide as a static memory allocator, but i am not able to fix the size of this pool, its keep growing, there should be way to restrict its size. for example i want a pool of 200 chunks only so i can take 200 chunks after that it should though NULL please let me now how to do this

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1 Answer 1

I don't think boost pool provides what you want. Actually there are 4 other template parameters for boost::pool_allocator except the type of object:

  • UserAllocator: Defines the method that the underlying Pool will use to allocate memory from the system(default = boost::default_user_allocator_new_delete).
  • Mutex: Allows the user to determine the type of synchronization to be used on the underlying singleton_pool(default = boost::details::pool::default_mutex).
  • NextSize: The value of this parameter is passed to the underlying Pool when it is created and specifies the number of chunks to allocate in the first allocation request (default = 32).
  • MaxSize: The value of this parameter is passed to the underlying Pool when it is created and specifies the maximum number of chunks to allocate in any single allocation request (default = 0).

You may think MaxSize is exactly what you want, but unfortunately it's not. boost::pool_allocator uses a underlying boost::singleton_pool which is based on an boost::pool, the MaxSize will eventually pass to the data member of boost::pool<>: max_size, so what role does the max_size play in the boost::pool? let's have a look at boost::pool::malloc():

void * malloc BOOST_PREVENT_MACRO_SUBSTITUTION()
{ //! Allocates a chunk of memory. Searches in the list of memory blocks
  //! for a block that has a free chunk, and returns that free chunk if found.
  //! Otherwise, creates a new memory block, adds its free list to pool's free list,
  //! \returns a free chunk from that block.
  //! If a new memory block cannot be allocated, returns 0. Amortized O(1).
  // Look for a non-empty storage
  if (!store().empty())
    return (store().malloc)();
  return malloc_need_resize();
}

Obviously, boost::pool immediately allocates a new memory block if no free chunk available in the memory block. Let's continue to dig into the malloc_need_resize():

template <typename UserAllocator>
void * pool<UserAllocator>::malloc_need_resize()
{ //! No memory in any of our storages; make a new storage,
  //!  Allocates chunk in newly malloc aftert resize.
  //! \returns pointer to chunk.
  size_type partition_size = alloc_size();
  size_type POD_size = static_cast<size_type>(next_size * partition_size +
      math::static_lcm<sizeof(size_type), sizeof(void *)>::value + sizeof(size_type));
  char * ptr = (UserAllocator::malloc)(POD_size);
  if (ptr == 0)
  {
     if(next_size > 4)
     {
        next_size >>= 1;
        partition_size = alloc_size();
        POD_size = static_cast<size_type>(next_size * partition_size +
            math::static_lcm<sizeof(size_type), sizeof(void *)>::value + sizeof(size_type));
        ptr = (UserAllocator::malloc)(POD_size);
     }
     if(ptr == 0)
        return 0;
  }
  const details::PODptr<size_type> node(ptr, POD_size);

  BOOST_USING_STD_MIN();
  if(!max_size)
    next_size <<= 1;
  else if( next_size*partition_size/requested_size < max_size)
    next_size = min BOOST_PREVENT_MACRO_SUBSTITUTION(next_size << 1, max_size*requested_size/ partition_size);

  //  initialize it,
  store().add_block(node.begin(), node.element_size(), partition_size);

  //  insert it into the list,
  node.next(list);
  list = node;

  //  and return a chunk from it.
  return (store().malloc)();
}

As we can see from the source code, max_size is just related to the number of chunks to request from the system next time, we can only slow down the speed of increasing via this parameter.
But notice that we can defines the method that the underlying pool will use to allocate memory from the system, if we restrict the size of memory allocated from system, the pool's size wouldn't keep growing. In this way, boost::pool seems superfluous, you can pass the custom allocator to STL container directly. Here is a example of custom allocator(based on this link) which allocates memory from stack up to a given size:

#include <cassert>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <new>

template <std::size_t N>
class arena
{
    static const std::size_t alignment = 8;
    alignas(alignment) char buf_[N];
    char* ptr_;

    bool
        pointer_in_buffer(char* p) noexcept
    { return buf_ <= p && p <= buf_ + N; }

public:
    arena() noexcept : ptr_(buf_) {}
    ~arena() { ptr_ = nullptr; }
    arena(const arena&) = delete;
    arena& operator=(const arena&) = delete;

    char* allocate(std::size_t n);
    void deallocate(char* p, std::size_t n) noexcept;

    static constexpr std::size_t size() { return N; }
    std::size_t used() const { return static_cast<std::size_t>(ptr_ - buf_); }
    void reset() { ptr_ = buf_; }
};

template <std::size_t N>
char*
arena<N>::allocate(std::size_t n)
{
    assert(pointer_in_buffer(ptr_) && "short_alloc has outlived arena");
    if (buf_ + N - ptr_ >= n)
    {
        char* r = ptr_;
        ptr_ += n;
        return r;
    }
    std::cout << "no memory available!\n";
    return NULL;
}

template <std::size_t N>
void
arena<N>::deallocate(char* p, std::size_t n) noexcept
{
    assert(pointer_in_buffer(ptr_) && "short_alloc has outlived arena");
    if (pointer_in_buffer(p))
    {
        if (p + n == ptr_)
            ptr_ = p;
    }
}

template <class T, std::size_t N>
class short_alloc
{
    arena<N>& a_;
public:
    typedef T value_type;

public:
    template <class _Up> struct rebind { typedef short_alloc<_Up, N> other; };

    short_alloc(arena<N>& a) noexcept : a_(a) {}
    template <class U>
    short_alloc(const short_alloc<U, N>& a) noexcept
        : a_(a.a_) {}
    short_alloc(const short_alloc&) = default;
    short_alloc& operator=(const short_alloc&) = delete;

    T* allocate(std::size_t n)
    {
        return reinterpret_cast<T*>(a_.allocate(n*sizeof(T)));
    }
    void deallocate(T* p, std::size_t n) noexcept
    {
        a_.deallocate(reinterpret_cast<char*>(p), n*sizeof(T));
    }

    template <class T1, std::size_t N1, class U, std::size_t M>
    friend
        bool
        operator==(const short_alloc<T1, N1>& x, const short_alloc<U, M>& y) noexcept;

    template <class U, std::size_t M> friend class short_alloc;
};

template <class T, std::size_t N, class U, std::size_t M>
inline
bool
operator==(const short_alloc<T, N>& x, const short_alloc<U, M>& y) noexcept
{
    return N == M && &x.a_ == &y.a_;
}

template <class T, std::size_t N, class U, std::size_t M>
inline
bool
operator!=(const short_alloc<T, N>& x, const short_alloc<U, M>& y) noexcept
{
    return !(x == y);
}


int main()
{
    const unsigned N = 1024;
    typedef short_alloc<int, N> Alloc;
    typedef std::vector<int, Alloc> SmallVector;
    arena<N> a;
    SmallVector v{ Alloc(a) };
    for (int i = 0; i < 400; ++i)
    {
        v.push_back(10);
    }

}
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