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Is there any way to execute some SQL commands in .sql file from within Python, but not all SQL commands in the file? Suppose I have the following .sql file:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableA`;

CREATE TABLE `tableA`(
some_code
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableB`;

CREATE TABLE `tableB`(
some_code
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableC`;

CREATE TABLE `tableC`(
some_code
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

...to be continued...

In this file, I want to parse and run only tableB-related command (i.e. drop and create tableB), but don't like to execute any SQL commands on other tables from within Python. I have some knowledge on how to execute .sql file from within Python, but don't know how to execute only some specific commands in .sql file as stated in the above example. The first thing striking upon my head is to use regular expression. But after a little bit of wrangling, I couldn't come up with the correct regex syntax to get me what I expected due to my poor regex knowledge and experience.

So my question is,

1) Is it the correct way here to use regular expression to get only the desired commands, and if so, can you show me the correct syntax to parse it?

2) If regular expression is not the best way here, what is an alternative solution?

3) I found some online regex testing tools, but all of them is to specify both the expression and test strings, and highlight matched data in the string. I believe it's great if there are some tools that have me specify test strings first, then highlight the desired data within the string manually, and then returns some appropriate syntax/expression adversely. If you know such tools (no restriction to online tools! I'm also glad if it's Macintosh Application), please tell me...

Thanks.

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1) I'd say you have other options than regex for this, but that does not mean you cannot use it. 2) Parsing the statements would be safer. 3)Any tool which creates regex based upon a selection will never be the appropriate level of accurate and generalizing at the same time. –  melwil May 27 '13 at 11:36
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

While regex may not be the right tool, you can still use it.

>>> statements = """
... DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableA`;
...
... CREATE TABLE `tableA`(
... some_code
... ) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
...
... DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableB`;
...
... CREATE TABLE `tableB`(
... some_code
... ) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
...
... DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableC`;
...
... CREATE TABLE `tableC`(
... some_code
... ) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
... """
>>> regex = r"((?:CREATE|DROP) TABLE (?:IF (?:NOT )?EXISTS )?`tableB`(?:[^;]|(?:'.*?'))*;)"
>>> re.findall(regex, statements, re.I)
['DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tableB`;', 'CREATE TABLE `tableB`(\nsome_code\n) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;']
>>>

If you are wondering what

`(?:[^;]|(?:'.*?'))*`

is for, it is simply used to match any character except ;, any amount of times, including none

or

a string literal, meaning it will allow ; to match inside a string like 'this is a ;value; for a varchar field'.

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Thanks. I still can't understand this part: (?:'.*?'); why do you have to quote .*? by ''? I think (?:[^;])*; is enough for the last part... What am I missing? –  Gardecolo May 27 '13 at 12:50
    
[^;]+ matches any character that isn't a ;. But an sql statement could have a value that contains one, which will be accepted by the sql engine. So I will allow anything inside '', even that semicolon. See this question for an example; stackoverflow.com/questions/16672539/… - I realise this isn't needed for your example cases, but if you want to match SQL in general, you will need it. –  melwil May 27 '13 at 13:11
    
There are some sql queries which include one or more semicolons in it but not on the end, so you can allow those queries to also work, and '.*?' means any characters (even semicolons) with zero or more times matched, also as few times as possible...right? Final question, is it indispensable to quote .*? by ''? Why does (?:.*?) not work? I'd like to know WHEN you have to quote by '' within regex pattern and when don't have to. Thanks. –  Gardecolo May 27 '13 at 13:53
    
You are correct, you want to match as little as possible to only get the value, nothing between two values. For the last question; I am not using '' to make the function of the regex any different. Neither quotes are regex characters, and only match as regular characters like a. The reason I have .*? inside quotes is because the only place I wish to allow matching "anything", is inside quoted values of an SQL statement. Example; INSERT INTO table (id, name) VALUES (1, 'firstname;lastname'); –  melwil May 27 '13 at 13:58
    
I realise insert statements are not part of your question, though. feel free to simplify as you see fit. –  melwil May 27 '13 at 14:09
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You can try out the sqlparse library that will ease your work by parsing SQL statements and give you the capapbility to query and work with tokens within a SQL statement. It can be a goos base to filter out statements containing a specific token like tableB in your case

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Awesome. I installed the module and tried to parse my file, it worked as expected. Thanks! –  Gardecolo May 27 '13 at 12:55
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Although I personally believe you should use some parsing library to parse an AST of the SQL, looking through the code makes this option viable too:

my_sql_code = '''DROP TABLE...''' #big long string, multiline
statements = my_sql_code.split(';')
statements = [s for s in statements if 'tableB' in s]
for s in statements:
    execute_sql(s)
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Thanks. I personally like to adopt either melwil's regex solution or sqlparse module as stated by Boud, since it doesn't work well if the string tableB were included somewhere in sql query and requires more coding, but I appreciate your answer. –  Gardecolo May 27 '13 at 13:02
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