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In a game I would like to search a map of items and return the one located on a particular square of the board. But what if the square is empty? (The items are not stored in the board structure. Never mind about that for the purposes of this question.) I have the code below, but what should I do to return an "empty" reference?

map<pair<int, int>, Item*> _items;

Item& itemAt(int row, int col) const {
    try {  
        return *_items.at(make_pair(row, col));
    } catch(out_of_range& e) {
        return // what goes here?            
    } 
}

Or is this the wrong approach and I should just use find()?

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2  
nitpick: since you do not modify e, catch by const-reference. –  Matthieu M. May 27 '13 at 13:12
    
looks like duplicate of this Q of mine... stackoverflow.com/questions/7847336/… –  NoSenseEtAl May 27 '13 at 14:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In this case, using a pointer as a means to represent "zero or one object" is useful:

Item* itemAt(int row, int col) const {
    try {
        return _items.at(make_pair(row, col));
    } catch(out_of_range& e) {
        return nullptr;
    }
}

However, using std::map::find() is probably a faster and cleaner approach.

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4  
+1 for using find, that's what it's for! –  Matthieu M. May 27 '13 at 13:12
    
Thanks for the responses. Based on your answers my code now looks like this: Item* itemAt(int row, int col) const { auto item = _impl._items.find(make_pair(row, col)); if (item == _impl._items.end()) { return nullptr; } return item->second.get(); } –  Jaldhar Jun 1 '13 at 17:29
    
bah can't get the formatting right. Apologies. –  Jaldhar Jun 1 '13 at 17:34

If not finding an item is not an error condition in your program, then you should not return a reference (since references cannot be null). Rather, you should return a (non-owning, most likely) pointer, and return nullptr in case the item was not found:

Item* itemAt(int row, int col) const {
    try {  
        return _items.at(make_pair(row, col));
    } catch(out_of_range& e) {
        return nullptr;
    }   
}

On the other hand, if not finding an item is an error, then you can return a reference (when the item is found) and let the exception propagate when the item is not found - the responsibility of handling it would belong to the part of your code that has strategic knowledge on how to handle it:

Item& itemAt(int row, int col) const {
    return *_items.at(make_pair(row, col));
}
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I was not able to work on this game until now but belated thanks to all who responded. It is quite possible that a given square on the grid will not contain an Item so I went with your first approach and I now return an Item pointer or nullptr if the square is empty. –  Jaldhar Jun 1 '13 at 17:21

If it is an error for client code to request an item that does not exist then throw an exception to report the failure and return an Item&.

If it is not an error, as the value_type of the map is already an Item* change the return type to be a Node* and return nullptr to indicate that at item at the requested position does not exist and use map::find().

To avoid lifetime problems, which already exist with Item& return type, consider changing the value_type to be a std::shared_ptr<Item>. If client code has a reference or a raw pointer to a value with the map and that element is removed from the map then the client is left with a dangling pointer/reference. Switching to a std::shared_ptr<Item> avoids this scenario. The itemAt() function would return a std::shared_ptr<Item>. This also has the benefit that the Items in the map do not need to be explicitly deleted.

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Thanks for the response. I did not include it in my original question for simplicities sake but my map actually contains unique_ptr<Item>'s. So I use item->get() to return a disposable pointer as the return value –  Jaldhar Jun 1 '13 at 17:38

Actually other people have had the same problem:

  • some of them wrote boost::optional
  • you can return a pair of pointer and return value
  • you can throw an exception
  • you can return a null object
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. boost::optional seems like the most elegant solution out of those you mention but as I mention in my other comments I ultimately went with just returning nullptr if an item was not found. –  Jaldhar Jun 1 '13 at 17:40

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