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I've read similar questions where the problem was usage of synchronized methods (like Math.random() ) or the work was too little to justify the overhead, however I don't think this is the case here.

My processor has 4 physical/8 logical cores. After one warmup I test the following code with n=1;2;3;4;8 on a 11x11 matrix;

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(n);
long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
double result = pool.submit(new Solver(pool, matrix)).get();
System.out.println(result);
long stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
long elapsedTime = stopTime - startTime;
System.out.println(elapsedTime);

Execution takes respectivelly:

1 ~ 15500 2 ~ 13500 - 14000 3 ~ 14300 - 15500 4 ~ 14500 - 19000 8 ~ 19000 - 23000

So I get a little boost with 2, almost no boost with 3, sometimes almost no boost, but sometimes extreme slowdown with 4 and complete slowdown with 8;

Here is the code:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;

public class Solver implements Callable<Double> {

    private ExecutorService pool;
    private double[][] matrix;


    public Solver(ExecutorService pool, double[][] matrix){
        this.pool = pool;
        this.matrix = matrix;
    }

    public double determinant(double[][] matrix) {
        if (matrix.length == 1)
            return (matrix[0][0]);

        double coefficient;
        double sum = 0;
        int threadsCount = ((ThreadPoolExecutor) pool).getMaximumPoolSize();
        ArrayList<Double> coefficients = new ArrayList<Double>();
        ArrayList<Future<Double>> delayedDeterminants = new ArrayList<Future<Double>>();

        for (int k = 0; k < matrix.length; k++) {
            double[][] smaller = new double[matrix.length - 1][matrix.length - 1];
            for (int i = 1; i < matrix.length; i++) {
                for (int j = 0; j < matrix.length; j++) {
                    if (j < k)
                        smaller[i - 1][j] = matrix[i][j];
                    else if (j > k)
                        smaller[i - 1][j - 1] = matrix[i][j];
                }
            }
            coefficient = ((k % 2 == 0) ? 1 : -1) * matrix[0][k];
            if (((ThreadPoolExecutor) pool).getActiveCount() < threadsCount
                    && matrix.length > 5) {
                coefficients.add(coefficient);
                delayedDeterminants.add(pool.submit(new Solver(pool, smaller)));
            } else
                sum += coefficient * (determinant(smaller));
        }

        try {
            for (int i = 0; i < coefficients.size(); i++)
                sum += coefficients.get(i) * delayedDeterminants.get(i).get();
        } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return (sum);
    }

    @Override
    public Double call() throws Exception {
        return determinant(matrix);
    }

}
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The general way to deal with such a divide and conquer algorithm is to descend to a certain level in a single thread, until there are enough independent tasks, then schedule all those tasks on the ExecutorService, letting further levels of recursion execute within the same task. For example, one level down you have 121 submatrices to compute the determinant of, so submit 121 tasks to the ExecutorService. Or go one more level to get 12,100 subproblems and submit all those.

Polling the ExecutorService for the active task count is probably not the best idea. Create a newFixedThreadPool(4) or whichever number of threads you want to test with and let the ExecutorService manage the task execution. If what you are trying to accomplish is work stealing, then I would warmly suggest spending some time to familiarize yourself with the Fork/Join framework, which manages work stealing automatically. It is designed to handle exactly your kind of tasks.

Another thing, not directly related to the question: you should definitely redesign the code so there is only a single 2D-array used for all computation. A 1D-array would be even better.

share|improve this answer
    
1&2) 11x11 is a small matrix, but it's not a small amount of calculations. The algorithm has a terrible complexity (something like (n!)^2 ). I tried it with a 12x12 matrix, it took 3 minutes per test. 100x100 matrix will literally take hundreds of years. 3) Not completely sure what you mean, if it's the getActiveCount() line the idea is if there are free threads I run the recursive task in a thread, otherwise I run it in the current thread. Note that I can't always run it in another thread, because it's recursive so a thread won't be free until all of its recursively called threads are. – ndn May 27 '13 at 15:39
    
I don't understand point (3) at all. – Martin James May 27 '13 at 17:15
    
@ndn ah yes, now it's coming back to me... It really does explode computationally. The general way to deal with such divide and conquer algorithm is to descend to a certain level in a single thread, until there are enough independent tasks, then schedule all those tasks on the ExecutorService, letting further levels of recursion execute within the same task. For example, you have 121 submatrices to compute the determinant of, so submit 121 tasks to the ExecutorService. – Marko Topolnik May 27 '13 at 17:28

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